Since 2004, Pew Research Center has issued an annual report on key audience and economic indicators for a variety of sectors within the U.S. news media industry. These data speak to the shifting ways in which Americans seek out news and information, how news organizations get their revenue, and the resources available to American journalists as they seek to inform the public about important events of the day. The press is sometimes called the fourth branch of government, but in the U.S., it’s also very much a business – one whose ability to serve the public is dependent on its ability to attract eyeballs and dollars.

Over the years, the Center’s approach to these indicators has evolved along with the industry, carefully considering the metrics, sectors and format in which the data appear. Instead of a single summary report, our approach is to roll out a series of fact sheets showcasing the most important current and historical data points for each sector – in an easy-to-digest format – a few at a time. (State of the News Media reports from 2004-2016 are archived as PDFs and available here.)

Listed below are the 2018 fact sheets released so far (noted as “Updated” beside their title), the sheets released in 2017 that have not yet been updated, and links to related reports and blog posts that provide other angles of analysis about the news media industry.

Media & NewsJuly 11, 2014

5 facts about alternative weeklies

This week’s 37th annual convention of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia comes at a time of challenge and turmoil in the “alt weekly” world. Here are 5 facts about trends in the industry.

Media & NewsJuly 10, 2014

5 key takeaways from our census of statehouse reporters

To inform citizens about what is happening in America’s 50 statehouses, there are currently 1,592 journalists assigned to cover their workings, according to a new Pew Research report.

Media & NewsJuly 10, 2014

America’s Shifting Statehouse Press

A new study finds 1,592 journalists reporting from U.S. statehouses where the ranks of newspaper reporters have shrunk, the number of journalists at nontraditional outlets has grown and observers worry about the quality of coverage.

Fact TankJune 5, 2014

Time Inc. spinoff reflects a troubled magazine business

Time Inc.’s troubles are emblematic of the economic challenges facing the consumer magazine industry.

Media & NewsMay 28, 2014

As the New York Times’ first black executive editor, Dean Baquet is in a distinct minority

The ascension of Dean Baquet—the first African-American to run the paper’s newsroom—has renewed the focus on minority hiring in the news industry.

Media & NewsMay 16, 2014

As Jill Abramson exits the NY Times, a look at how women are faring in newsrooms

In the past 15 years, the percentage of women who work in newspaper newsrooms has barely budged. Women made up 36% of all newspaper staff in 2012, a slight decline from 37% in 1998.

Fact TankMay 12, 2014

The acquisition binge in local TV

Media companies have dramatically expanding their local television holdings in recent years. Five companies own one-third of the about 1,400 local TV stations in the country.

Fact TankApril 25, 2014

As digital ad sales grow, news outlets get a smaller share

While the digital ad pie is growing, the numbers show that news organizations are competing for an increasingly smaller share of those dollars.

Fact TankApril 17, 2014

Five findings about digital video news

News audiences are watching more digital news video than ever before and newsrooms are investing in creating more video content.

Fact TankApril 10, 2014

Small digital news sites: young, lean and local

A new Pew Research Center State of the News Media analysis finds that the growing digital news world is largely comprised of hundreds of smaller sites, often local in scope, that are working to fill gaps left by legacy reporting cuts.