Hispanic Jan. 23, 2012

Latinos in the 2012 Election: Florida

Latinos now make up 13.1% of the Florida’s 11.2 million registered voters. Democrats account for 564,513 Latino registered voters while 452,619 Latino voters are Republicans.

Hispanic Nov. 8, 2011

Hispanic Poverty Rate Highest In New Supplemental Census Measure

Hispanics have the highest poverty rate of the nation’s largest racial and ethnic groups under an alternative Census Bureau calculation known as the Supplemental Poverty Measure. The alternative measure is intended to better reflect the costs of basic living expenses as well as the resources people have to pay them.

Sep. 28, 2011

Childhood Poverty Among Hispanics Sets Record, Leads Nation

More Latino children are living in poverty—6.1 million in 2010—than children of any other racial or ethnic group.

Hispanic Aug. 25, 2011

Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

The number of 18-to-24 year old Hispanics attending college in the United States hit an all-time high of 12.2 million in October 2010, driven by a single-year surge of 24% in Hispanic enrollment. Rising educational attainment was a dominant driver of the enrollment trends for young Hispanic adults, with the share of those completing high school and attending college on the rise.

Jul. 29, 2011

Wealth Gaps and Perception Gaps: A Paradox of the Great Recession

When the real estate market melted down, those hit hardest by the sharp drop in household wealth were blacks and Hispanics. But even while their wealth was being decimated, the political reaction among the nation’s minorities has been surprisingly muted.

Jul. 26, 2011

Wealth Gaps Rise to Record Highs Between Whites, Blacks and Hispanics

The lopsided wealth ratios are the largest since the government began publishing such data a quarter century ago and roughly twice the size of the ratios that had prevailed between these three groups for the two decades prior to the Great Recession that ended in 2009.

U.S. Politics Apr. 8, 2011

Civil War at 150: Still Relevant, Still Divisive

A century and a half after the firing on Fort Sumter, most Americans say the war between the North and South is still relevant to American politics and public life today. In a nation that has long endured deep racial divisions, the history of that era continues to elicit strong reactions. Nearly half of the public (46%) says it is inappropriate for today’s public officials to praise the leaders of the Confederate states during the war; 36% say such statements are appropriate.

Apr. 6, 2011

Multi-Race and the 2010 Census

When final national race counts from the 2010 Census were released last month, they included more than nine million Americans who self-identified as belonging to two or more race groups. One of them was not President Barack Obama.

Feb. 22, 2011

Who Are the People in Your Neighborhood?

People who turn to the Census Bureau’s latest data release in an effort to answer Sesame Street’s musical query may, in some cases, be puzzled by what they find. The detailed race, ethnicity and population counts make it easy to look up data for any block in America. But those numbers may not be completely accurate — and deliberately so.

Hispanic Feb. 9, 2011

Latinos and Digital Technology

Latinos are less likely than whites to access the internet, have a home broadband connection or own a cell phone. However, Hispanics and whites with similar socioeconomic characteristics have similar usage patterns for these technologies.