Pew Research Center’s Data Labs uses computational methods to complement and expand on the Center’s existing research agenda. The team collects text, network, and behavioral datasets, uses innovative computational techniques and empirical strategies for analysis, and generates original research. Data Labs also explores the limitations of these data and methods, and works toward establishing standards for use and analysis. Learn more about Data Labs here.

Internet & TechApril 9, 2018

Bots in the Twittersphere

An estimated two-thirds of tweeted links to popular websites are posted by automated Twitter accounts – not human beings.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 6, 2018

Use of election forecasts in campaign coverage can confuse voters and may lower turnout

Probability forecasts have gained prominence in recent years. But these forecasts may confuse potential voters and may even lower the likelihood that they vote.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 19, 2018

Very liberal or conservative legislators most likely to share news on Facebook

The most ideological members of Congress shared news stories on their Facebook pages more than twice as often as moderate legislators between Jan. 2, 2015, and July 20, 2017, according to a new Pew Research Center study that examined all official Facebook posts created by members of Congress in this period. The analysis included links […]

Pew Research CenterOctober 19, 2017

After Las Vegas attack, Democrats in Congress were far more likely than Republicans to mention guns on Facebook

In the week after the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas, partisan differences were on full display in how elected officials responded on Facebook.

Pew Research CenterAugust 21, 2017

Highly ideological members of Congress have more Facebook followers than moderates do

In both legislative chambers, members’ ideology is a strong predictor of the number of people who follow them on Facebook.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 23, 2017

For members of 114th Congress, partisan criticism ruled on Facebook

Facebook posts from members of the 114th Congress attracted more attention when they contained disagreement with the opposing party than when they expressed bipartisanship, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of over 100,000 posts.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 23, 2017

Partisan Conflict and Congressional Outreach

A new Pew Research Center analysis of more than 200,000 press releases and Facebook posts from the official accounts of members of the 114th Congress uses methods from the emerging field of computational social science to quantify how often legislators themselves “go negative” in their outreach to the public.

MethodsFebruary 23, 2017

Q&A with Solomon Messing of Pew Research Center’s Data Labs

A conversation with the director of the Center’s Data Labs team on their new report on congressional communications and the uses and misuses of “big data.”

Internet & TechJuly 11, 2016

Research in the Crowdsourcing Age, a Case Study

How scholars, companies and workers are using Mechanical Turk, a ‘gig economy’ platform, for tasks computers can’t handle

Media & NewsMay 5, 2016

Long-Form Reading Shows Signs of Life in Our Mobile News World

On cellphones, longer news stories get about twice the engaged time from readers as shorter pieces do. They also get roughly the same number of visitors.