Big houses, small houses: Partisans continue to want different things in a community
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Republicans and Democrats express sharply different preferences about their ideal communities and house sizes. And while large numbers of people in both parties say it is important to live in a community that is a good place to raise children, partisans diverge on whether it is important that a community is racially and ethnically diverse.

Republicans prefer to live in areas in which houses are larger, farther apartNearly two-thirds of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (65%) say they would prefer to live in a community where houses are larger and farther apart, but schools, stores and restaurants are several miles away.

By contrast, a majority of Democrats and Democratic leaners (58%) would rather live in a community in which houses are smaller and closer to each other, but schools, stores and restaurants are in walking distance.

The ideological differences in community preferences are stark, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in September among 9,895 U.S. adults. Conservative Republicans are about twice as likely as liberal Democrats to prefer a community where the houses are larger and more widely spaced (71% vs. 35%). These overall patterns of opinion are little changed from 2017.

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A majority of rural residents (69%) say they would rather live in a community with larger houses that are farther apart, while 60% of urban residents prefer communities with small houses. People who live in suburbs are more evenly divided.

Partisan gap in community preferences evident across community typesThe party gap in community preferences is evident even controlling for where people actually live. Among urban, suburban and rural residents, Republicans are significantly more likely than Democrats to express a preference for larger houses in more widely spaced communities.

When asked about important factors for choosing a community, Americans almost universally agree that it is important to live in a good place to raise children (90% say this is very or somewhat important).

A majority (64%) also says that it is important to live in a place that is racially and ethnically diverse.

Smaller shares say that it is important to live in communities where most other people share their political (41%) or religious (33%) values.

There is bipartisan agreement on the importance of a community being a good place to raise children; 92% of Republicans and 87% of Democrats say this is very or somewhat important.

Racial diversity in a community a higher priority for Democrats than RepublicansBut Democrats and Democratic leaners are nearly 30 percentage points more likely than Republicans and Republican leaners to say it is important to live in a community that is racially and ethnically diverse (77% vs. 48%). And while 42% of Republicans say it is important to live in a community where most people share their religious views, fewer Democrats (25%) say the same.

Notably, there are no significant differences between Republicans and Democrats on the importance of living in a community where most people share their political views. But in both parties, those with strong ideological views are more likely than others to value living in a community where people share their views about politics.

Nearly half of conservative Republicans (47%) say it is very or somewhat important to live in a community where most people share their political views; only 27% of moderate and liberal Republicans say the same. Among Democrats, a higher share of liberals (53%) than conservatives and moderates (37%) place importance on living in a community where most share their political views.

Note: Here are the questions used for this report, along with responses, and its methodology.