U.S. Politics Jun. 20, 2007

Why Change the Channel?

For most of the public, broadcast network news is all the same. Not so cable news: Nearly half the public sees real differences among CNN, Fox News and MSNBC.

Media & News May. 25, 2007

A Quarter’s Worth of News Coverage

Three-month review of media finds Iraq coverage was mostly about the U.S., while 2008 campaign coverage was mostly about Democrats.

U.S. Politics May. 17, 2007

Who’s Watching American Idol?

In spite of the fact that the show has topped the television ratings throughout the season, as American Idol Season 6 comes to a close the latest news interest survey finds three-quarters of the public paying little or no attention to it.

Media & News Mar. 12, 2007

State of the American News Media, 2007: Mainstream Media Go Niche

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s fourth annual report finds every sector of TV news lost audience in 2006. Newspapers, while garnering larger audiences for their content via online platforms, faced more downbeat financial assessments.

Internet & Tech Feb. 6, 2007

Election Newshounds Speak Up

If you ask political news consumers what they like most about their favorite platform for news, a vivid image of a typical TV, newspaper, and internet political news consumer will emerge from their own comments. All three media forms win praise from their primary fans for their convenience but the context for its definition varies.

Media & News Sep. 11, 2006

How 9-11 Changed the News

Coverage of foreign affairs and terrorism soars; domestic issues languish and soft news holds firm.

Media & News Aug. 17, 2006

Cable News: A Maturing Platform with an Uncertain Future

A Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism roundtable brings together a panel of cable news industry leaders. Some predict the medium will adapt to the changing news consumer while others believe dramatic innovations are necessary.

Media & News Mar. 14, 2006

State of the News Media

As audiences shift to new online media, print’s problems have accelerated. But newspapers can still avoid a death spiral, according to the Project for Excellence in Journalism.