THE U.S. ASIAN POPULATION is a diverse one. A record 20 million Asian Americans trace their roots to more than 20 countries in East and Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, each with unique histories, cultures, languages and other characteristics. The 19 largest origin groups together account for 94% of the total Asian population in the U.S.






Click on an origin group below to explore detailed demographic and economic data.



FACT SHEETS ON ASIANS IN THE U.S.



Bangladeshis Indians Nepalese
Bhutanese Indonesians Pakistanis
Burmese Japanese Sri Lankans
Cambodians Koreans Thai
Chinese Laotians Vietnamese
Filipinos Malaysians
Hmong Mongolians


Find detailed information on the methodology for these fact sheets.

ReligionSeptember 1, 2017

Strong religious beliefs are only one part of Muslim American identity

Nearly all Muslim Americans (97%) say they take pride in being a member of the Islamic faith. But their devotion to core religious beliefs and practices is only part of a religious identity.

HispanicAugust 3, 2017

5 key facts about U.S. lawful immigrants

Lawful immigrants account for three-quarters of the foreign-born population in the U.S. – 33.8 million people out of 44.7 million people in 2015.

July 27, 2017

7 facts about Americans with disabilities

There were nearly 40 million Americans with a disability in 2015, representing 12.6% of the civilian non-institutionalized population.

ReligionJuly 26, 2017

U.S. Muslims Concerned About Their Place in Society, but Continue to Believe in the American Dream

Despite the concerns and perceived challenges they face, 89% of Muslims say they are both proud to be American and proud to be Muslim.

GlobalJuly 6, 2017

More than half of new green cards go to people already living in the U.S.

About a million immigrants receive U.S. green cards each year, but fewer than half are new arrivals from other countries. The majority already live in the United States on temporary visas.

June 12, 2017

Key facts about race and marriage, 50 years after Loving v. Virginia

Intermarriage has increased steadily since the 1967 Loving v. Virginia ruling. Here are more key findings about interracial and interethnic marriage and families.

June 8, 2017

Among U.S. cohabiters, 18% have a partner of a different race or ethnicity

A half-century after the Supreme Court legalized interracial marriage in the United States, 18% of all cohabiting adults have a partner of a different race or ethnicity – similar to the share of U.S. newlyweds who have a spouse of a different race or ethnicity (17%).

June 6, 2017

The rise of multiracial and multiethnic babies in the U.S.

One-in-seven U.S. infants were multiracial or multiethnic in 2015, nearly triple the share in 1980.

U.S. PoliticsJune 1, 2017

Dislike of candidates or campaign issues was most common reason for not voting in 2016

The share of registered voters who cited a “dislike of the candidates or campaign issues” as their main reason for not voting reached a new high of 25%.

May 18, 2017

Intermarriage across the U.S. by metro area

The share of newlyweds married to someone of a different race or ethnicity has been steadily climbing in the United States.