MethodsFebruary 7, 2019

Phone vs. online surveys: Why do respondents’ answers sometimes differ by mode?

Pew Research Center conducts surveys over the phone and, increasingly, online. But these two formats don’t always produce identical results.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 6, 2019

How highly religious Americans view evolution depends on how they’re asked about it

Evolution remains a contentious issue. When asked about it, highly religious Americans’ responses can vary depending on how the question is asked.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 29, 2019

‘Good jobs’ vs. ‘jobs’: Survey experiments can measure the effects of question wording – and more

The way polling questions are asked can influence people’s answers. Survey experiments are one way to measure the degree to which different questions elicit different answers.

MethodsDecember 6, 2018

How asking about your sleep, smoking or yoga habits can help pollsters verify their findings

Pew Research Center uses benchmarking questions to ensure our surveys are accurate. Learn why and how we use these questions.

Pew Research CenterNovember 1, 2018

Exit polls, election surveys and more: A guide for the 2018 midterms

On election night 2018, besides the exit polls there will be an additional source of data on who voted and why, developed by The Associated Press, Fox News and NORC at the University of Chicago and based on a very different methodology. That means that depending on where you go for election news, you may get a somewhat different portrait of this year’s electorate.

Pew Research CenterOctober 18, 2018

‘Defining the universe’ is essential when writing about survey data

Given the wide range of people we speak to for our polls – and the issues we ask them about – it’s important to be as clear as possible about exactly who says what. In research circles, this practice is sometimes called “defining the universe.”

MethodsAugust 6, 2018

Video Explainer: What are nonprobability surveys?

Our latest Methods 101 video explores some of the ways these surveys differ from traditional probability-based polls.

Pew Research CenterAugust 3, 2018

When writing about survey data, 51% might not mean a ‘majority’

For many people, “majority” is a word so common that they rarely have to think twice about what it means. But it’s a different matter for polling organizations like Pew Research Center. At the Center, writers cannot label a survey finding a “majority” unless it meets specific criteria.

ReligionJuly 5, 2018

How Does Pew Research Center Measure the Religious Composition of the U.S.? Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

At Pew Research Center, we frequently receive questions about how we measure religion. Here are answers to some of the questions we get most frequently.

Pew Research CenterMay 14, 2018

Can we still trust polls?

Donald Trump’s victory in 2016 and the U.K. “Brexit” decision rattled public confidence in polls. Our new video explains why well-designed polls can be trusted.