Fact Tank Jul. 28, 2014

Q/A: What the New York Times’ polling decision means

While online survey panels have long been used by market researchers, they’re relatively new in the opinion-research field, and views on them are sharply divided.

Fact Tank May. 8, 2014

Q/A: How Pew Research tracks public opinion in countries stricken by violence and unrest

Fact Tank sat down with James Bell, Pew Research’s director of international survey research, to discuss how the center designs and implements its surveys in places of conflict like Ukraine.

Oct. 9, 2013

Study: Polls may underestimate anti-gay sentiment and size of gay, lesbian population

A study using a novel research method raises questions.

Sep. 30, 2013

Study: Opposition to same-sex marriage may be understated in public opinion polls

Blame “social desirability” bias.

Fact Tank Sep. 10, 2013

Can presidential speeches change minds? The evidence suggest not

The presidency may well be a “bully pulpit,” in Theodore Roosevelt’s original sense, a position that commands attention. But as President Barack Obama prepares to address the nation Tuesday in support of taking military action against Syria, there’s little evidence (at least in recent times) that presidential speeches are very effective at moving the needle […]

U.S. Politics Jul. 26, 2013

Government Surveillance: A Question Wording Experiment

To better understand how the manner in which the government’s surveillance program is described affects public evaluations, the Pew Research Center conducted a question wording experiment.

Fact Tank Jun. 13, 2013

How Pew Research conducted its national LGBT community survey

Why did Pew Research decide to conduct an LGBT-specific survey? We know from our surveys of the general public that there’s been a sharp increase in support for same-sex marriage and in societal acceptance of homosexuality over the past decade. Of course, we’re on the cusp of an important historical and cultural moment with the […]

Fact Tank May. 22, 2013

Polling when public attention is limited: Different questions, different results

Different outcomes in different polls about the subpoenas served on the Associated Press in a Justice Department leak investigation were a case study in the challenges pollsters face in a breaking news environment when public attention and information is relatively limited.

U.S. Politics Nov. 7, 2012

A Comparison of Results from Surveys by the Pew Research Center and Google Consumer Surveys

As internet use grows– whether through a traditional computer, tablet, gaming device or cell phone – new techniques are being developed to conduct social research and measure people’s behavior and opinion while they are online.

U.S. Politics Sep. 17, 2012

What is the Value of a ’Generic” Candidate or Ballot in Polls?

Pollsters sometimes match a “generic” Republican or Democratic candidate against an incumbent, or use a generic ballot to forecast which party is ahead in congressional elections. How to read these polls.