Mar. 11, 2009

Magnet or Sticky?

At first glance, magnet and sticky states may seem to be mirror opposites of each other, and it is true that most states score high on one scale and low on another. But it turns out that 10 states rank high on both scales, and another nine score low on both. Find out where your state lands.

Jan. 29, 2009

For Nearly Half of America, Grass Is Greener Somewhere Else

Where would Americans most like to live — and how do they feel about the place they currently call home?

INT__DataViz-MigrationFlows
Dec. 17, 2008

Map: Comings and Goings: Migration Flows in the United States

Americans have settled down somewhat recently, but they have traditionally been on the move. Use our interactive maps and charts to trace predominant U.S. migration patterns over recent decades and find out which localities are “sticky” (high retention rates) and which are “magnets” (high rates of attraction).

Dec. 17, 2008

American Mobility: Movers,Stayers, Places and Reasons

Americans are settling down: Only 13% of the U.S. population changed residences between 2006 and 2007, the lowest share since the 1940s. A new Pew Research Center survey looks at the reasons people move and stay put, and explains why 23% of adults aren’t living in the place they consider home. Also, an interactive set of maps with detailed regional and state data shows that Texas is the nation’s “stickiest” state and Nevada is the most “magnetic.” Visit the maps to find stats on all 50 states.

Global Jan. 17, 2008

Italy’s Malaise: La Vita Non É Cosí Dolce

Taken aback by critical depictions of their country’s “collective funk,” Italians’ spirits are flagging — but not their sense of cultural superiority.

Hispanic Jul. 6, 2006

Gender and Migration

America departs from a reported worldwide trend toward an increasing number of female migrants. The continued predominance of male migrants into the United States is explained by the relatively large proportion of illegal entrants among their numbers.

Global Jul. 6, 2006

Muslims in Europe

Muslims living in Europe worry about their future, and many say they have had a bad experience as a result of their religion or ethnicity. But Muslims there do not generally believe most Europeans are hostile toward people of their faith.

Hispanic Feb. 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

Strict requirements, insufficient information about registration procedures and lack of public interest hobbled Mexico’s first effort to conduct absentee voting among its more than ten million adult citizens living in the United States.

Global Feb. 24, 2004

A Global Generation Gap

Generational differences fuel much of current social and political tension in Western Europe and the United States over globalization, nationalism and immigration, according to an in-depth analysis of results from the Pew Global Attitudes surveys.