report | Nov 3, 2011

The Generation Gap and the 2012 Election

In the last four national elections, generational differences have mattered more than they have in decades. According to the exit polls, younger people have voted substantially more Democratic than other age groups in each election since 2004, while older voters have cast more ballots for Republican candidates in each election since 2006.

report | Nov 3, 2011

The Generation Gap and the 2012 Election

Overview In the last four national elections, generational differences have mattered more than they have in decades. According to the exit polls, younger people have voted substantially more Democratic than other age groups in each election since 2004, while older voters have cast more ballots for Republican candidates in each election since 2006. The latest […]

report | Feb 3, 2011

Generations and their gadgets

While many devices have become popular across generations, younger adults are leading the way in increased mobility, preferring laptops to desktops and using their cell phones for a variety of functions.

report | Dec 20, 2010

Baby Boomers Approach 65 – Glumly

As the leading edge of the giant Baby Boomer generation turns 65 on January 1, 2011, a Pew Research roundup of new and recent surveys finds that this age group is more downbeat than others about the trajectory of their lives and the direction of the nation as a whole. This report explores Boomers’ political and social values; their economic hopes and fears and their overall satisfaction with life.

report | Dec 16, 2010

Generations 2010

Major trends in how different generations of Americans use the internet

presentation | Mar 19, 2010

Baby Boomers in the Digital Age

Lee Rainie discusses recent Pew Internet findings about how Baby Boomers use the internet at the Boomer Business Summit in Chicago.

report | Sep 3, 2009

Recession Turns a Graying Office Grayer

Older adults are staying in the labor force longer, and younger adults are staying out of it longer. Both trends intensified with the recession and are expected to continue after the economy recovers. One reason: Older workers value not just a paycheck, but the psychological and social rewards.

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