Katerina Eva Matsa

Associate Director, Research

Publications
report | Jul 3, 2015

Methodology: As Greeks head to the polls, the Twitter conversation differs by language

This analysis of the Twitter discussions surrounding the 2015 Greek referendum employed media research methods that combined Pew Research’s content analysis rules with computer coding software developed by Crimson Hexagon (CH). This report is based on examination of about 2.5 million Twitter statements that were identified as being about the Greek developments in light of the July […]

report | Jun 1, 2015

Millennials and Political News

Millennials rely on Facebook for their political news, while Baby Boomers turn to local TV. And while Millennials are less engaged with political news, they trust news sources as much as older generations do.

short read | May 22, 2015

The declining value of U.S. newspapers

Over the past two decades, major newspapers across the country have seen a recurring cycle of ownership changes and steep declines in value.

report | May 7, 2015

Methodology: On UK elections, the talk on Twitter is largely negative

This analysis of the Twitter discussions surrounding the 2015 United Kingdom (UK) elections employed media research methods that combined Pew Research’s content analysis rules with computer coding software developed by Crimson Hexagon (CH). This report is based on examination of about 13.5 million Twitter statements that were identified as being about the parties competing for the elections […]

short read | Mar 13, 2015

Study finds racial, ethnic divide in attention to crime news

Crime consistently ranks as one of the most followed and discussed topics by the public, and it receives more attention in local news media than almost any other subject. A recent Pew Research Center report reinforces these findings but also suggests that certain groups of residents pay closer attention to local crime than others in […]

report | Oct 21, 2014

Political Polarization & Media Habits

Liberals and conservatives turn to and trust strikingly different news sources. And across-the-board liberals and conservatives are more likely than others to interact with like-minded individuals.

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