GlobalJuly 22, 2016

Few American women have broken the glass ceiling of diplomacy

Over 4,600 U.S. ambassadors have served in foreign countries since the founding of the nation – and only 9% of them have been women.

U.S. PoliticsJuly 19, 2016

More minority federal judges have been appointed under Democratic than Republican presidents

Since 1945, Democratic presidents have appointed three times as many black judges, and also more Hispanic and Asian judges, to the federal bench as their Republican counterparts.

June 28, 2016

Blacks have made gains in U.S. political leadership, but gaps remain

In 1965, there were no black senators or governors, and just six House members were black. By 2015, there was more representation in some areas but little change in others.

U.S. PoliticsMay 10, 2016

What kind of person runs for vice president?

Of the 72 people who’ve been nominated for vice president on a major-party (or significant third-party) ticket since 1868, most have served in one or both houses of Congress or been a state governor.

April 28, 2016

Census Bureau hopes to use data from other government agencies in 2020

Anyone who has filed a U.S. tax return, applied for a Social Security number or signed up for Medicare has given personal data to the government. So when the Census Bureau counts the American public, can it use the information that other federal agencies have already collected?

ScienceApril 22, 2016

For Earth Day, here’s how Americans view environmental issues

The 1970s were an important era for American environmentalism. Congress passed the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act, President Nixon established the Environmental Protection Agency, and the nation’s first Earth Day – created by Democratic Sen. Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin – was held on April 22, 1970. Forty-six years later, Earth Day has […]

U.S. PoliticsMarch 31, 2016

Campaign Exposes Fissures Over Issues, Values and How Life Has Changed in the U.S.

The 2016 presidential campaign has exposed deep disagreements between – and within – the two parties on a range of major policy issues.

U.S. PoliticsMarch 28, 2016

Garland Nomination to Supreme Court Gets Positive Reception From Public

Although Merrick Garland’s nomination to the Supreme Court faces an uncertain fate in the Senate, more Americans say they favor (46%) than oppose (30%) Garland’s confirmation to the high court. About a quarter (24%) offer no opinion.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 26, 2016

Long Supreme Court vacancies used to be more common

If Senate Republicans stick with their declared intention to not consider anyone President Obama might nominate to replace Antonin Scalia, his seat on the Supreme Court likely would remain vacant for a year or more. That would be the longest vacancy on the court for nearly five decades, but by no means the longest ever in U.S. history. In fact, for much of the 19th century it was not uncommon for Supreme Court seats to be unoccupied for months – or, in a few cases, years – at a time.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 24, 2016

Scalia’s Supreme Court vacancy draws much public interest, unlike past open seats

Such high levels of interest and engagement weren’t common in past Supreme Court nomination battles.