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Mark Hugo Lopez

Director, Global Migration and Demography Research

Mark Hugo Lopez is director of global migration and demography research at Pew Research Center. He leads planning of the Center’s research agenda on international demographic trends, international migration, U.S. immigration trends and the U.S. Latino community. He is an expert on immigration globally and in the U.S., world demography, U.S. Hispanics and Asian Americans. Lopez was previously the Center’s director of Hispanic research, and prior to that served as the associate director.

Lopez is the co-editor of “Adjusting to a World in Motion: Trends in Global Migration and Migration Policy.” He is a co-author of “The Future of the First Amendment” and has contributed chapters to several books about voting and young Latinos.

Prior to joining Pew Research Center, Lopez served as a research assistant professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy and as research director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE).

Lopez received his doctorate in economics from Princeton University. He is an author of reports about the Hispanic electorate, Hispanic identity and immigration. Lopez frequently appears in national and international media in both Spanish and English.

Publications
HispanicNovember 9, 2018

Key takeaways about Latino voters in the 2018 midterm elections

Latinos made up an estimated 11% of all voters nationwide on Election Day, nearly matching their share of the U.S. eligible voter population.

HispanicOctober 25, 2018

More Latinos Have Serious Concerns About Their Place in America Under Trump

About half of U.S. Latinos say the situation for Hispanics in the U.S. has worsened over the past year, and a majority say they worry that they or someone they know could be deported.

Pew Research CenterOctober 16, 2018

Want to understand U.S. immigration? We’ve got an email course for you

Want to learn more about immigration? Our researchers have distilled much of what we know about the topic into a five-part email mini-course.

HispanicOctober 15, 2018

Key facts about Latinos in the 2018 midterm elections

More than 29 million Latinos are eligible to vote nationwide in 2018. The pool of eligible Hispanic voters has steadily grown in recent years.

HispanicOctober 12, 2018

Hispanic voter registration rises in Florida, but role of Puerto Ricans remains unclear

The number of Hispanic registered voters in Florida has increased 6.2% since the 2016 presidential election, to a record 2.1 million people. Hispanics now make up a record 16.4% of Florida’s registered voters, up from 15.7% in 2016.

HispanicSeptember 13, 2018

Key facts about young Latinos, one of the nation’s fastest-growing populations

Youth is a defining characteristic of the U.S. Latino population. Latinos ages 35 or younger accounted for well over half of the nation’s Latino population in 2016.

HispanicSeptember 11, 2018

Latinos are more likely to believe in the American dream, but most say it is hard to achieve

Hispanics are more likely than the general U.S. public to believe in the American dream – that hard work will pay off and that each generation is better off than the one prior.

Pew Research CenterApril 2, 2018

Most Hispanic parents speak Spanish to their children, but this is less the case in later immigrant generations

The share of Latino parents who ensure the Spanish language lives on with their children declines as their immigrant connections become more distant.

HispanicJanuary 11, 2018

Among U.S. Latinos, the internet now rivals television as a source for news

On a typical weekday, three-quarters of U.S. Latinos get their news from internet sources, nearly equal to the share who do so from television, according to a 2016 survey of Latino adults by Pew Research Center.

HispanicDecember 20, 2017

Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away

High intermarriage rates and declining immigration are changing how some Americans with Hispanic ancestry see their identity. Most U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry self-identify as Hispanic, but 11%, or 5 million, do not.