Pew Research CenterMarch 29, 2018

Why do people belong to a party? Negative views of the opposing party are a major factor

Sizable majorities of Democrats and Republicans cite the other party’s harmful policies as a major reason they belong to their party.

U.S. PoliticsMarch 22, 2018

Positive Views of Economy Surge, Driven by Major Shifts Among Republicans

Americans’ views of national economic conditions continue to improve, with the share saying the economy is in good or excellent condition now at its highest point in nearly two decades.

U.S. PoliticsMarch 20, 2018

Wide Gender Gap, Growing Educational Divide in Voters’ Party Identification

While partisanship among voters usually does not change much on a yearly basis, some differences have widened over time, especially by educational attainment, gender and age.

Pew Research CenterMarch 8, 2018

Negative views of democracy more widespread in countries with low political affiliation

Across 35 nations, a median of 26% do not identify with any political party in their country. In countries where more people are unaffiliated with any political party, popular support for representative democracy is also lower.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 25, 2018

Economic Issues Decline Among Public’s Policy Priorities

Economic issues are viewed as less important policy priorities than they were just a few years ago.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 24, 2018

Public Has Mixed Expectations for New Tax Law

A month after Donald Trump and Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the public has mixed views of the sweeping tax overhaul and its long-term impact.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 23, 2018

Republicans and Democrats Grow Even Further Apart in Views of Israel, Palestinians

The partisan divide in Middle East sympathies, for Israel or the Palestinians, is now wider than at any point since 1978.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 4, 2018

Split U.S. Senate delegations have become less common in recent years

Doug Jones’ victory in Alabama gives that state its first split Senate delegation in more than two decades. But delegations with two senators of different parties still are much less common than they used to be: With 14 split delegations, the current Senate is tied for the second-fewest in the past 50 years.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 19, 2017

Far more Americans say there are strong conflicts between partisans than between other groups in society

Americans are far more likely to say there are strong conflicts between Democrats and Republicans in the U.S. today than to say the same for other groups.

U.S. PoliticsNovember 28, 2017

Americans are split on the principle of pre-emptive military force

Half of Americans say using military force against countries that may seriously threaten the U.S. – but have not attacked it – can often or sometimes be justified.