Fact TankDecember 31, 2015

Your favorite Fact Tank data in 2015

From Millennials in the workforce to religion in America, our most popular posts told important stories about trends shaping our world.

Fact TankDecember 22, 2015

15 striking findings from 2015

From trust in government to views of climate change, here are some of Pew Research Center’s most memorable findings of the year.

Fact TankNovember 19, 2015

U.S. public seldom has welcomed refugees into country

Public opinion data going back to the 1930s shows that generally speaking, Americans oppose large numbers of refugees entering the country.

Pew Research CenterNovember 19, 2015

More Mexicans Leaving Than Coming to the U.S.

Between 2009 and 2014, about 140,000 more Mexican immigrants have returned to Mexico from the U.S. than have migrated here, citing family reunification as the main reason for leaving.

Fact TankOctober 30, 2015

In a shift away from New York, more Puerto Ricans head to Florida

The number of Puerto Ricans living in Florida has surpassed 1 million for the first time, while the Empire State’s Puerto Rican population has remained flat.

Fact TankOctober 14, 2015

Puerto Ricans leave in record numbers for mainland U.S.

Last year, 84,000 people left Puerto Rico for the U.S. mainland, a 38% increase from 2010. At the same time, the number of people moving to Puerto Rico from the mainland declined.

Pew Research CenterOctober 8, 2015

On Immigration Policy, Wider Partisan Divide Over Border Fence Than Path to Legal Status

As immigration emerges as a key issue in the presidential campaign, there is little common ground between Republicans and Democrats in views of several immigration policy proposals.

Fact TankOctober 7, 2015

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

Today’s volume of immigrants is in some ways a return to America’s past.

Fact TankOctober 5, 2015

Today’s newly arrived immigrants are the best-educated ever

Four-in-ten immigrants arriving in the U.S. in the past five years had completed at least a bachelor’s degree. In 1970, only 20% of newly arrived immigrants were similarly educated.

Fact TankOctober 5, 2015

Future immigration will change the face of America by 2065

A snapshot of the U.S. in 2065 would show a nation that has 117 million more people than today, with no racial or ethnic majority group taking the place of today’s white majority.