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Bruce Stokes

Director, Global Economic Attitudes

Bruce Stokes is director of global economic attitudes at Pew Research Center, where he assesses public views about economic conditions, foreign policy and values. He is also a non-resident fellow at the German Marshall Fund and an associate fellow at Chatham House. He is the former international economics correspondent for the National Journal, a former senior transatlantic fellow at the German Marshall Fund and a former senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he is a member. Stokes is author of the recent Pew Research Center studies: U.S. Image Suffers as Publics Around the World Question Trump’s Leadership; Post Brexit, Europeans More Favorable Toward EU; Globally, Broad Support for Representative and Direct Democracy; Japanese Divided on Democracy’s Success at Home, but Value Voice of the People; Three Years In, Modi Remains Very Popular. Stokes is a graduate of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and Johns Hopkins University’s School for Advanced International Studies. He has appeared on numerous television and radio programs including CNN, BBC, NPR, NBC, CBS and ABC and is a frequent speaker at major conferences around the world.

Publications
GlobalOctober 1, 2018

Trump’s International Ratings Remain Low, Especially Among Key Allies

Donald Trump’s international image remains poor, and ratings for the U.S. have declined since his election. Yet most people around the world still want the U.S., not China, as the world’s leading power.

GlobalSeptember 26, 2018

Americans, Like Many in Other Advanced Economies, Not Convinced of Trade’s Benefits

People in advanced and emerging economies generally agree that growing trade and business ties with other nations are good for their country, but fewer are convinced such ties lead to more jobs, higher wages or lower prices at home.

GlobalSeptember 13, 2018

In Advanced and Emerging Economies Alike, Worries About Job Automation

Average citizens around the world see a technological revolution coming in the workplace, and they are concerned. Many fear robots and computers will eliminate jobs and increase inequality.

GlobalJuly 19, 2018

Populist views in Europe: It’s not just the economy

Nostalgia, ethnocentrism and a belief that Islam is incompatible with a country’s culture and values also factor into nationalist populism in Europe.

Pew Research CenterJune 21, 2018

Differing views of immigrants pose a test for Germany’s coalition government

The differences over immigration policy between Germany’s Christian Democratic Union and Christian Social Union are also evident among backers of the parties.

Pew Research CenterApril 20, 2018

U.S. trade deficits with other countries can vary significantly, depending on how they’re measured

The United States runs a far larger merchandise trade deficit with China than with any other nation. But when the trade deficit is measured in other ways, the U.S. actually has a larger imbalance with countries outside of China.

Pew Research CenterApril 13, 2018

U.S. foreign policy experts are more pessimistic about democracy than their European counterparts

Foreign policy experts on opposite sides of the Atlantic have markedly different assessments of the way democracy is working in their countries.

GlobalNovember 15, 2017

Three Years In, Modi Remains Very Popular

Most Indians hold a favorable opinion of Narendra Modi, and many are content with the state of the economy and the country’s direction. The public is also satisfied with the way their democracy is working.

GlobalOctober 17, 2017

Japanese Divided on Democracy’s Success at Home, but Value Voice of the People

Though Japanese are split on their democracy’s performance, most endorse representative democracy and back referenda on major policy issues.

GlobalOctober 16, 2017

Globally, Broad Support for Representative and Direct Democracy

Across the world, a median of 78% say representative democracy is a good way to govern their country. Yet, pro-democracy views coexist with openness to nondemocratic forms of governance.