November 2, 2012

Adults in Mid- to Late-30s Worry Most about Retirement Finances

53%

More than half of adults ages 36 to 40 say they are either “not too” or “not at all” confident that their incomes and assets will last through retirement.

In 2009 it was “Gloomy Boomers” in their mid-50s who were the most worried that they would outlive their retirement nest eggs. Today, retirement worries peak among adults in their late 30s—many of whom are the older sons and daughters of the Baby Boom generation. According to a Pew Research analysis of Federal Reserve Board data, this is also the age group that has suffered the steepest losses in household wealth in recent years.

A recent Pew Research survey finds that among adults between the ages of 36 and 40, 53% say they are either “not too” or “not at all” confident that their income and assets will last through retirement. In contrast, only about a third (34%) of those ages 60 to 64 express similar concerns, as do a somewhat smaller share (27%) of those 18 to 22 years old.

That stands in sharp contrast to 2009 when it was Baby Boomers between the ages of 51 and 55 who were the most concerned that their money would not last through their retirement years. Only 18% of those 36 to 40 years old were similarly worried they would fall short financially after they retire – a third of the share who express a similar concern today.

Federal reserve Board data show the median net worth of adults in their late 30s and early 40s has fallen at a far greater rate than for any other age group both in the past 10 years and since the beginning of the Great Recession. Read More