short read | Jul 18, 2013

5 facts about ethnic and gender diversity in U.S. newsrooms

Last week, San Francisco Bay area television station KTVU broadcast fake names for the pilots of the Asiana Airline flight that crashed on July 6. The error involved ethnic stereotyping, leading the Asian American Journalists Association to assert that these kinds of mistakes “underscored the importance of newsroom diversity” at America’s media outlets. A similar […]

short read | Jun 28, 2013

For African Americans, discrimination is not dead

America’s struggles with race and racism are never completely out of the news. But it is hard to remember when a series of stories have given this issue such resonance, whether in the rulings of the Supreme Court on affirmative action and voting rights, a tense trial in a Florida courtroom and even the racially insensitive comments of a celebrity chef.

report | Aug 2, 2012

The Middle Class Shrinks and Income Segregation Rises

A new Pew Research Center report shows that the share of upper-income households living in neighborhoods that are mainly upper income has risen from 1980 to 2010, as has the share of lower-income households living in neighborhoods where most other households are lower income. Income segregation also has grown in most of the nation's largest metropolitan areas.

report | Aug 2, 2012

The Rise in Residential Segregation by Income

Paul Taylor, executive vice president of the Pew Research Center, answers questions on the Center's study showing an increase in residential segregation by income in the nation's largest metro areas.

report | Aug 1, 2012

The Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan areas1 , according to a new analysis of census tract2 and household income data by the Pew Research Center. The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were […]

report | Apr 8, 2011

Civil War at 150: Still Relevant, Still Divisive

Overview As the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War approaches, most Americans say the war between the North and South is still relevant to American politics and public life today. More than half of Americans (56%) say the Civil War is still relevant, according to the latest national survey by the Pew […]

short read | Jan 18, 2011

Pakistanis Favor Workplace Segregation

The great majority of Pakistanis (85%) favor a law that would require men and women to be segregated in the workplace -- far more than in any other Muslim country polled in 2010.

report | Oct 28, 2010

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

The national political backlash against illegal immigration has created new divisions among Latinos and heightened their concerns about discrimination against members of their ethnic group-including those who were born in the United States or who immigrated legally.

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