Feature | Nov 10, 2015
Google Play Store Apps Permissions

Pew Research Center performed an analysis of 1,041,336 apps in the Google Play Store as of September 2014 to determine the specific permissions requested by each app.

Short Read | Nov 10, 2015
Key takeaways on mobile apps and privacy

Six-in-ten app downloaders have chosen not to install an app when they discovered how much personal information the app required in order to use it.

Report | Nov 10, 2015
Apps Permissions in the Google Play Store

Analysis of over 1 million apps in Google’s Android operating system in 2014 shows apps can seek 235 different kinds of permissions from smartphone users. The average app asks for five permissions.

Presentation | Oct 5, 2015
The Next Digital Disruptions

Lee Rainie discusses three technology revolutions of the past decade and how a fourth revolution is now underway at the State of the Net 2015 conference in Milan, Italy.

Report | Aug 26, 2015
Americans’ Views on Mobile Etiquette

For many Americans, cellphones are always present and rarely turned off. This creates new social challenges, as people believe that different public and social settings warrant different sensitivities for civil behavior.

Report | Apr 15, 2015
Cell Phones in Africa: Communication Lifeline

In a few short years, the proliferation of mobile phone networks has transformed communications in sub-Saharan Africa. It has also allowed Africans to skip the landline stage of development and jump right to the digital age.

Report | Apr 1, 2015
Methodology: How Crimson Hexagon Works

To arrive at the results regarding the tone or frame of discussion on social media, and specifically Twitter, Pew Research often uses computer coding software provided by Crimson Hexagon. That software is able to analyze the textual content from all publicly available posts on Twitter. Crimson Hexagon (CH) classifies online content by identifying statistical patterns […]

Presentation | Feb 25, 2015
The Fourth Digital Revolution

Lee Rainie discusses the rise of the internet of things and how all the data it creates will enrich the picture we have about what is happening in communities and media.

Report | Feb 12, 2015
How Different Groups Think about Scientific Issues

Different demographic groups think differently about scientific issues. For example, those more likely to think genetically modified food is unsafe include women, African-Americans and Hispanics, and those without college degrees. Those more likely to say parents should be able to decide whether to vaccinate their children include younger adults, Republicans and independents.

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