Apr. 8, 2010

Census in the News

Stories about the 2010 Census account for a growing — albeit small — fraction of total U.S. news coverage.

Hispanic Apr. 1, 2010

Latinos and the 2010 Census: The Foreign Born Are More Positive

Foreign-born Latinos are more likely to say the census is good for the Hispanic community and are more knowledgeable about the process than native-born Latinos. But large majorities of both groups plan to participate.

Pew Research Center Mar. 24, 2010

Why does the Census ask for your age?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

U.S. Politics Mar. 24, 2010

Young People Make Up Large Proportion of Census Hold-Outs

Younger Americans are found to be more likely to say they might not participate, even when analysis controls for other demographic characteristics.

Pew Research Center Mar. 22, 2010

How does the Census know its participate rate?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Mar. 16, 2010

The Census: College Students Count — but Where?

Should college students be counted in the 2010 Census at their parents’ home or their school address? The Census Bureau has a cut-and-dried answer, but this question recurs each decade because census rules and people’s preferences are not always in sync.

U.S. Politics Mar. 16, 2010

Census: Growing Awareness, Most Ready For Forms

Those with lower levels of income and education remain significantly less likely than others to say they will take part in the census. All partisans want to participate, but Democrats are more likely than independents or Republicans to say the census will benefit their community.

Mar. 3, 2010

Census History: Counting Hispanics

Despite the long history of Hispanic residents in the United States, there was no systematic effort to count this group separately in the Census until the late 20th century. An analysis of changes in Census question wording over recent decades reveals the challenges in trying to count and describe this fast-growing population.

Feb. 12, 2010

The Prisoner Dilemma

Should the Census count inmates in the areas where they are incarcerated or try to link them to their hometowns?

Religion Jan. 26, 2010

A Brief History of Religion and the U.S. Census

Public debate over the propriety, merit and feasibility of the Census Bureau asking questions about religion has waxed and waned over many decades with religious groups, civil liberty groups, social scientists and the Census Bureau’s own staff divided over the issue.