Fact Tank Aug. 7, 2013

Sign of things to come? Integration without blacks in New York City neighborhoods

In a new study, researchers found nearly a three-fold increase in the share of integrated New York City neighborhoods with a mix of whites, Hispanics and Asians but few, if any, blacks.

Pew Research Center Aug. 2, 2012

The Rise in Residential Segregation by Income

Paul Taylor, executive vice president of the Pew Research Center, answers questions on the Center’s study showing an increase in residential segregation by income in the nation’s largest metro areas.

INT__Map-Segregation
Aug. 1, 2012

Map: Residential Income Segregation

Residential Income Segregation Maps of Top 10 U.S. Metro Areas

Aug. 1, 2012

Growing Share of Americans Live in Income-Segregated Neighborhoods

Upper- and lower-income Americans are more likely now than 30 years ago to live in economically segregated neighborhoods, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis. Residential segregation by income has risen in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest metropolitan areas since 1980, with the big three in Texas — Houston, Dallas and San Antonio — leading the way.

Dec. 2, 2008

Americans Claim to Like Diverse Communities but Do They Really?

People express pro-diversity attitudes to pollsters but U.S. neighborhoods have grown more politically and economically homogenous in recent decades, according to analyses of election returns and U.S. Census data.

Hispanic Aug. 30, 2007

A Changing Racial and Ethnic Mix in U.S. Public Schools

A new analysis of public school enrollment data by the Pew Hispanic Center finds that in the dozen years from 1993-94 to 2005-06, white students became significantly less isolated from minority students while, at the same time, black and Hispanic students became slightly more isolated from white students.