Fact Tank Sep. 25, 2014

National Congregations Study finds more church acceptance of gays and lesbians

A new survey of American religious congregations finds that in recent years, more churches have become welcoming to openly gay and lesbian couples.

Fact Tank Sep. 23, 2014

Is religion’s declining influence good or bad? Those without religious affiliation are divided

Atheists, agnostics and people who have no religion in particular may be growing in number in the United States, but they are not uniformly against religion having a role in society.

Religion Sep. 22, 2014

Public Sees Religion’s Influence Waning

Nearly three-quarters of Americans now think religion is losing influence in American life, and most who say this also see it as a bad thing. Perhaps as a consequence, a growing share of the public wants religion to play a role in U.S. politics.

Fact Tank Sep. 22, 2014

In some European countries, church membership means paying more taxes

Are government church taxes causing Germans to leave the church?

Fact Tank Sep. 9, 2014

The divide over ordaining women

Only 11% of American congregations were led by women in 2012, according to press reports of an upcoming National Congregations Study survey. That figure hasn’t changed since 1998.

Fact Tank Aug. 27, 2014

Many religions heavily concentrated in one or two countries

Half of the world’s population lives in just six countries. But in many cases, the world’s major religious groups are even more concentrated.

Fact Tank Jul. 22, 2014

In 30 countries, heads of state must belong to a certain religion

A new Pew Research analysis finds that 30 of the world’s countries (15%) belong to a unique group of nations that call for their heads of state to have a particular religious affiliation.

Fact Tank Jul. 17, 2014

How many people of different faiths do you know?

A Pew Research Center survey shows how many people in religious groups know other people of different religions.

Fact Tank Jul. 16, 2014

U.S. evangelical Christians are chilly toward atheists – and the feeling is mutual

U.S. Christians, as a whole, express negative feelings toward atheists, and the chilliness is reciprocated, according to a Pew Research survey on how Americans rate eight religious groups.

Religion Jul. 16, 2014

How Religious Groups View One Another

When asked to rate religious groups on a “feeling thermometer” ranging from 0 to 100, Americans rate Jews, Catholics and evangelical Christians warmly and atheists and Muslims more coldly.