U.S. Politics Dec. 19, 2007

Gas Prices, Disasters Top News Interest in 2007

Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public’s top news stories in 2007 but, as was the case in 2006, the rising price of gasoline attracted the largest audience of any news story.

U.S. Politics Dec. 18, 2007

What Was — and Wasn’t — On the Public’s Mind in 2007

A compilation of the top 15 stories in which public opinion played a significant role, and the year’s most notable “non-barking dogs.”

U.S. Politics Nov. 9, 2007

Iraq News: Less Dominant, Still Important

Both media coverage of the conflict and public interest in it have fallen, but a growing number of Americans would like to see more war coverage, especially of U.S. troops and returning veterans.

Media & News Oct. 29, 2007

The Invisible Primary – Invisible No Longer

In the early months of the 2008 campaign, the media had essentially winnowed the race to a handful of candidates and offered Americans relatively little information about their records or what they would do if elected.

U.S. Politics Oct. 23, 2007

Modest Interest in 2008 Campaign News

Many more Republicans are able to recall unprompted the names of Democratic frontrunners Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama than can name Rudy Giuliani and other leading GOP candidates.

U.S. Politics Aug. 23, 2007

Who Watches Wall Street?

Interest in the stock market is currently relatively high, but only a minority of Americans regularly follows economic news unless, like gas and food prices, it hits directly on the average pocketbook.

U.S. Politics Aug. 22, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

In the second of two parts, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience news preferences to examine news interest across decades and describe how the public’s news interests have changed — or not changed — over different news eras.

Media & News Aug. 20, 2007

Presidential Campaign Overtakes Iraq as Media’s Top Story

The 2008 Presidential campaign — with its crowded field and accelerated timetable — emerged as the leading story in the American news media in the second quarter of 2007, supplanting the policy debate over Iraq.

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

Despite dramatic structural changes in the news media since the 1980s, the interests of news audiences have changed very little over the past several decades. Disaster News and Money News have been at the top of the charts throughout, while Tabloid News and Foreign News have been at the bottom. In this first of two reports, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience preferences taken by the PRC (and predecessor organizations) since 1986.

U.S. Politics Aug. 2, 2007

Public Blames Media for Too Much Celebrity Coverage

An overwhelming majority of the public (87%) says celebrity scandals receive too much news coverage; and most who say celebrity news is over-covered blame the media — not the public.