U.S. Politics Apr. 11, 2011

Budget Negotiations in a Word

The public has an overwhelmingly negative reaction to the budget negotiations that narrowly avoided a government shutdown. A weekend survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Washington Post finds that “ridiculous” is the word used most frequently to describe the budget negotiations.

U.S. Politics Apr. 4, 2011

Most Want Budget Compromise but Split on Who’s to Blame for a Shutdown

With a deadline approaching for a possible shutdown of the federal government, the public remains divided over whether congressional Republicans or the Obama administration would be more to blame if a shutdown occurs.

U.S. Politics Mar. 16, 2011

Republicans Are Losing Ground on the Deficit, But Obama’s Not Gaining

Far fewer Americans now say that Republicans in Congress have the better approach to the budget deficit than did so in November with the GOP losing ground among political independents as well as key elements of the its base, including Tea Party supporters. But the public is no more supportive of Barack Obama’s approach to the budget deficit than it was in November.

U.S. Politics Feb. 11, 2011

Tea Party’s Hard Line on Spending Divides GOP

Across a wide range of issues — including entitlements, education, agriculture and energy — Tea Party Republicans take a much harder line on cutting federal spending than do non-Tea Party Republicans, who are far more in sync with Democrats.

U.S. Politics Feb. 10, 2011

Rethinking Budget Cutting

Views about federal spending are beginning to change. Americans no longer call for more spending on many popular programs. Still, support for cutting spending remains limited, though in a few cases it has risen noticeably. The public remains reluctant either to cut spending — or to raise taxes – to balance state budgets.

Pew Research Center Jan. 24, 2011

Your online news quiz says defense is the biggest item in the budget. That right?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

U.S. Politics Jan. 20, 2011

Economy, Jobs Top Public’s Policy Agenda

Americans overwhelmingly cite the economy and jobs as the most important issues facing the president and new Congress. On health care reform, roughly as many would like to see legislation expanded as have it repealed.

U.S. Politics Jan. 12, 2011

Strengthen Ties with China, But Get Tough on Trade

As President Obama prepares to host Chinese President Hu Jintao next week, Americans increasingly see Asia as the region of the world that is most important to the United States. While Americans see China as a rising global power, relatively few characterize the U.S.-China relationship as adversarial; China is seen primarily as an economic threat, rather than a military one.

Pew Research Center Dec. 14, 2010

Reagan’s Recession

In the depths of the 1981-1982 recession, Americans were far more displeased with their president and his policies than were their predecessors during the Great Depression, more so even than in today’s high-unemployment economy.

U.S. Politics Dec. 13, 2010

Tax Deal Wins Broad Bipartisan Support

The public views the tax agreement between Obama and congressional Republicans as beneficial to both the economy and their personal finances. There are virtually no partisan differences in opinions about the agreement.