report | Oct 29, 2014

Cyber Attacks Likely to Increase

Experts believe nations, rogue groups, and malicious individuals will step up their assaults on communications networks, targeting institutions, financial services agencies, utilities, and consumers over the next decade. Many also predict effective counter moves will generally contain the damage.

report | Jul 14, 2014

Global Opposition to U.S. Surveillance and Drones, but Limited Harm to America’s Image

Revelations about the scope of American electronic surveillance efforts have generated headlines around the world. A new Pew Research Center survey finds widespread decline in the view that the U.S. respects the personal freedoms of its people. But in most countries there is little evidence this opposition has severely harmed America’s overall image.

short read | Jul 14, 2014

Where the U.S. wiretap hotspots are

While the U.S. continues to address the international fallout from the National Security Agency revelations, a new report from the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts reveals a different kind of wiretapping: a list of where federal and state judges have authorized law enforcement to listen to phone communications as part of criminal investigations throughout 2013.

report | Jan 20, 2014

Obama’s NSA Speech Has Little Impact on Skeptical Public

Survey Report President Obama’s speech on Friday outlining changes to the National Security Agency’s collection of telephone and internet data did not register widely with the public. Half say they have heard nothing at all about his  proposed changes to the NSA, and another 41% say they heard only a little bit. Even among those […]

presentation | Dec 12, 2013

Privacy, Confidentiality, and the Use of Data

Lee Rainie will discuss privacy, confidentiality, and the use of data at the 2013 meeting of the Pacific Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research

report | Nov 4, 2013

Most Say Monitoring Allied Leaders’ Calls Is Unacceptable

In the wake of reports that the NSA has been listening to phone calls of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other heads of state, a 56% majority of Americans say it is unacceptable for the U.S. to monitor the phones of allied leaders, while 36% say the practice is acceptable.

report | Nov 4, 2013

Trading Privacy for Security

Americans believe that the National Security Agency may have gone too far in spying on U.S. allies. They also think that the NSA has intruded on personal privacy in scooping up massive amounts of phone calls and emails, but don't expect to see citizens taking to the streets.

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