Pew Research Center age breaks for Silent, Baby Boomer, GenX and Millennial Generations

Pew Research Center reports and data on the Millennial generation, those born between 1981 and 1996 and the first generation to come of age in the new millennium.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 3, 2015

Most Millennials Resist the ‘Millennial’ Label

Just 40% of U.S. adults ages 18 to 34 identify with the term “Millennial.” Generational identity is strongest for Boomers, with 79% of those 51 to 69 seeing themselves as part of the “Baby Boom generation.”

Pew Research CenterJuly 29, 2015

More Millennials Living With Family

Despite improvements in the labor market, Millennials today are less likely to be living independently of their families and establishing their own households than they were in the depths of the Great Recession.

Fact TankMay 27, 2015

Q&A: A look at what’s driving the changes seen in our Religious Landscape Study

Fact Tank sat down with David Campbell, a professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, to explore what the new findings mean.

Fact TankMay 12, 2015

Millennials increasingly are driving growth of ‘nones’

The 35% of Millennials who do not identify with a religion is double the share of unaffiliated Baby Boomers (17%) and more than three times the share of members of the Silent generation (11%).

Pew Research CenterMarch 19, 2015

Comparing Millennials to Other Generations

Our interactive graphic compares the generations today and in the years that each generation was young (ages 18 to 33) to demonstrate this sea change in the activities and experiences of young adults that has occurred over the past 50 years.

Fact TankFebruary 27, 2015

63% of Republican Millennials favor marijuana legalization

Republican Millennials, however, are not as supportive of marijuana legalization as their young Democratic and Democratic-leaning counterparts.

Fact TankFebruary 25, 2015

South Korea’s Millennials downbeat about payoff of education, future

Young people there were less likely than those ages 50 and older to say children today will be better off financially than their parents.

Fact TankFebruary 18, 2015

European Millennials more likely than older generations to view China favorably

About half of young Europeans ages 18 to 33 have a positive view of China, but that view is tempered by their opinions about that country’s human rights record.

Fact TankFebruary 11, 2015

European Millennials are cool toward Russia, but warmer than older generations

In six of seven European Union countries surveyed by the Pew Research Center, roughly a third or less of young people born after 1980 have a favorable opinion of Russia.

Fact TankFebruary 10, 2015

U.S. and European Millennials differ on their views of fate, future

A majority of younger Europeans don’t feel that they can impact the world around them or their future, a stark contrast with their American counterparts.