Pew Research CenterMay 31, 2018

U.S. population keeps growing, but House of Representatives is same size as in Taft era

The U.S. House of Representatives has one voting member (435 in total) for every 747,000 or so Americans. That’s by far the highest ratio of population to representatives of any industrialized democracy, and the highest it’s ever been in U.S. history.

U.S. PoliticsApril 12, 2018

Proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution seldom go anywhere

The vast majority of proposed amendments die quiet, little-mourned deaths in committees and subcommittees.

Pew Research CenterApril 11, 2018

Near-record number of House members not seeking re-election in 2018

More members of the U.S. House of Representatives are choosing not to seek re-election than at any time in the past quarter-century.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 1, 2018

There’s a large gender gap in congressional Facebook posts about sexual misconduct

About seven-in-ten women in Congress mentioned sexual misconduct in their official Facebook posts between Oct. 1 and Dec. 30, 2017, compared with 37% of men in Congress.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 19, 2018

Very liberal or conservative legislators most likely to share news on Facebook

The most ideological members of Congress shared news stories on their Facebook pages more than twice as often as moderate legislators between Jan. 2, 2015, and July 20, 2017, according to a new Pew Research Center study that examined all official Facebook posts created by members of Congress in this period. The analysis included links […]

Pew Research CenterJanuary 16, 2018

Congress has long struggled to pass spending bills on time

In the four decades that the current system for budgeting and spending tax dollars has been in effect, Congress has managed to pass all required appropriations bills on time only four times.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 11, 2018

Despite GOP control of Congress and White House, lawmaking lagged in 2017

In 2017, Republicans gained control of both houses of Congress and the White House for the first time in a decade, but unified GOP control of the legislative and executive branches didn’t lead to a burst of lawmaking.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 4, 2018

Split U.S. Senate delegations have become less common in recent years

Doug Jones’ victory in Alabama gives that state its first split Senate delegation in more than two decades. But delegations with two senators of different parties still are much less common than they used to be: With 14 split delegations, the current Senate is tied for the second-fewest in the past 50 years.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 18, 2017

Sharing the News in a Polarized Congress

Political divides in the American news landscape do not end with Americans’ preferences for different news sources; rather, they extend to how members of the U.S. Congress communicate with constituents in the digital age.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 13, 2017

U.S. Senate seats rarely have flipped to other party in recent special elections

Senate seats have rarely flipped to the other party in recent special elections, and turnout usually lags compared with regular elections for the same seat.