Pew Research CenterJanuary 19, 2018

Very liberal or conservative legislators most likely to share news on Facebook

The most ideological members of Congress shared news stories on their Facebook pages more than twice as often as moderate legislators between Jan. 2, 2015, and July 20, 2017, according to a new Pew Research Center study that examined all official Facebook posts created by members of Congress in this period. The analysis included links […]

Pew Research CenterJanuary 16, 2018

Congress has long struggled to pass spending bills on time

In the four decades that the current system for budgeting and spending tax dollars has been in effect, Congress has managed to pass all required appropriations bills on time only four times.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 11, 2018

Despite GOP control of Congress and White House, lawmaking lagged in 2017

In 2017, Republicans gained control of both houses of Congress and the White House for the first time in a decade, but unified GOP control of the legislative and executive branches didn’t lead to a burst of lawmaking.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 4, 2018

Split U.S. Senate delegations have become less common in recent years

Doug Jones’ victory in Alabama gives that state its first split Senate delegation in more than two decades. But delegations with two senators of different parties still are much less common than they used to be: With 14 split delegations, the current Senate is tied for the second-fewest in the past 50 years.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 18, 2017

Sharing the News in a Polarized Congress

Political divides in the American news landscape do not end with Americans’ preferences for different news sources; rather, they extend to how members of the U.S. Congress communicate with constituents in the digital age.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 13, 2017

U.S. Senate seats rarely have flipped to other party in recent special elections

Senate seats have rarely flipped to the other party in recent special elections, and turnout usually lags compared with regular elections for the same seat.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 11, 2017

For the first time, more Americans say 2010 health care law has had a positive than negative impact on U.S.

While the future of the Affordable Care Act is in question, the American public increasingly thinks the law has had a positive impact on the country.

U.S. PoliticsNovember 2, 2017

Declining Confidence in Trump, Lower Job Ratings for Congressional Leaders

Amid tax debates, deficit concerns are lower today than during the Obama administration. As approval of congressional leaders drops, confidence in Trump on several measures also declines.

Pew Research CenterOctober 19, 2017

After Las Vegas attack, Democrats in Congress were far more likely than Republicans to mention guns on Facebook

In the week after the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas, partisan differences were on full display in how elected officials responded on Facebook.

Pew Research CenterOctober 6, 2017

A closer look at who does (and doesn’t) pay U.S. income tax

Taxpayers with incomes of $200,000 or more paid well over half (58.8%) of federal income taxes, though they accounted for only 4.5% of all returns filed (6.8% of all taxable returns). By contrast, taxpayers with incomes below $30,000 filed nearly 44% of all returns but paid just 1.4% of all federal income tax.