U.S. PoliticsFebruary 23, 2017

For members of 114th Congress, partisan criticism ruled on Facebook

Facebook posts from members of the 114th Congress attracted more attention when they contained disagreement with the opposing party than when they expressed bipartisanship, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of over 100,000 posts.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 23, 2017

Partisan Conflict and Congressional Outreach

A new Pew Research Center analysis of more than 200,000 press releases and Facebook posts from the official accounts of members of the 114th Congress uses methods from the emerging field of computational social science to quantify how often legislators themselves “go negative” in their outreach to the public.

MethodsFebruary 23, 2017

Q&A with Solomon Messing of Pew Research Center’s Data Labs

A conversation with the director of the Center’s Data Labs team on their new report on congressional communications and the uses and misuses of “big data.”

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 22, 2017

In Trump Era, What Partisans Want From Their Congressional Leaders

As President Trump prepares for his address next week to a joint session of Congress, Republicans say they are more inclined to trust the president, rather than GOP congressional leaders, if the two sides disagree.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 2, 2017

The changing face of Congress in 5 charts

Apart from its political makeup and policy objectives, the new Congress differs from prior ones in other ways, including its demographics.

ReligionJanuary 3, 2017

Faith on the Hill

The share of U.S. adults who describe themselves as Christians has been declining for decades, but the U.S. Congress is about as Christian today as it was in the early 1960s.

Fact TankDecember 1, 2016

Will Trump’s backing revive moribund term-limits movement?

Although the movement to limit congressional terms has been largely dormant for the past two decades, 15 states do limit how many terms their own legislators can serve.

Fact TankSeptember 7, 2016

House seats rarely flip from one party to the other

Big partisan shifts in the House of Representatives happen, but not often. In only three of the past 12 election cycles has one party posted a net gain of more than 30 seats, and on average 93% of House members who seek re-election are voted back into office.

Fact TankAugust 8, 2016

Split-ticket districts, once common, are now rare

In 2012, only 26 House districts out of 435 chose one party’s presidential nominee and the other party’s candidate for the House.

Fact TankJune 28, 2016

Blacks have made gains in U.S. political leadership, but gaps remain

In 1965, there were no black senators or governors, and just six House members were black. By 2015, there was more representation in some areas but little change in others.