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Carroll Doherty

Director, Political Research

Carroll Doherty is director of political research at Pew Research Center. He plays a leading role in developing the Center’s research agenda and overseeing editorial content about long-term trends in political values, U.S. views on policy issues and priorities, and political knowledge and news interest. Doherty regularly provides analysis of public opinion and politics for domestic and international news outlets, including NPR, CNBC and the BBC. He also speaks to government, academic and business groups on these topics. Before joining Pew Research Center in 2000, he was a journalist for many years, covering congressional leadership, politics and foreign affairs as a senior writer for Congressional Quarterly and serving as an off-air investigative reporter for CBS News on foreign affairs. Doherty holds a master’s degree from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Loyola University Maryland. 

Publications
U.S. PoliticsNovember 29, 2018

In midterm voting decisions, policies took a back seat to partisanship

Partisan loyalty and dislike of the opposing party and its candidates were major factors for voters’ choices in this month’s midterms.

U.S. PoliticsOctober 22, 2018

More in U.S. see drug addiction, college affordability and sexism as ‘very big’ national problems

In the nearly two years since the 2016 presidential election, Americans’ views of the seriousness of several national problems have changed, with concerns about drug addiction, college affordability, sexism and racism on the rise.

Pew Research CenterJune 18, 2018

Americans broadly support legal status for immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children

Nearly three-quarters of Americans favor granting permanent legal status to immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally when they were children.

Pew Research CenterApril 26, 2018

Key findings on Americans’ views of the U.S. political system and democracy

How do Americans feel about their own democracy? Read key findings from our recent report on Americans’ views of democracy in America.

U.S. PoliticsOctober 5, 2017

Key takeaways on Americans’ growing partisan divide over political values

Our surveys conducted in June and July found little common ground among Republicans and Democrats on fundamental values. Here are eight takeaways.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 20, 2017

6 things we’ve learned since the 2016 election

It has been a tumultuous 10 weeks since Donald Trump’s stunning victory. Here are six key findings from our U.S. political surveys since the election.

Fact TankAugust 25, 2016

5 facts about Trump supporters’ views of immigration

Immigration policy has been a focal point of Donald Trump’s campaign since he first announced he was running for president. Here’s a look at where his supporters stand on the issue.

Fact TankJune 22, 2016

Key facts about partisanship and political animosity in America

Republicans and Democrats now have more negative views of the opposing party than at any point in nearly a quarter century. These sentiments are not just limited to views of the parties and their policy proposals; they have a personal element as well.

Fact TankMay 27, 2016

Mixed verdict from public on America’s global standing

At a time when Donald Trump is vowing to “make America great again,” Americans think the country already is pretty great – at least when compared with other nations. Our recent report on views of America’s Place in the World found that 72% think the United States is the world’s leading military power, while 54% say it is the top economic power.

Fact TankMay 23, 2016

5 facts about how Americans view the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Far more Americans continue to sympathize more with Israel (54%) than with the Palestinians (19%) in the Middle East dispute, according to our recent foreign policy survey. And half of Americans (50%) think a way can be found for Israel and an independent Palestinian state to coexist peacefully, while 42% say this is not possible. […]