Prior to joining the Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project, Lopez was Research Director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) as well as a Research Assistant Professor at the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland. His areas of expertise include labor economics, civic engagement, voting behavior and the economics of education. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. Read full bio

Sep. 19, 2013

High rate of deportations continue under Obama despite Latino disapproval

The Obama administration has provided a way for young unauthorized immigrants brought to the country illegally as children to remain in the U.S., but the total number of deportations of unauthorized immigrants continue at near record levels.

Sep. 5, 2013

What is the future of Spanish in the United States?

As the share of Hispanics who speak Spanish falls, the share that speaks only English at home is expected to rise.

Sep. 4, 2013

Among recent high school grads, Hispanic college enrollment rate surpasses that of whites

Aug. 29, 2013

D.C., Virginia and Maryland have the highest shares of college-educated Latinos

Aug. 13, 2013

Spanish is the most spoken non-English language in U.S. homes, even among non-Hispanics

Spanish is, by far, the most spoken non-English language in the U.S., but not all Spanish speakers are Hispanic. Some 2.8 million non-Hispanics speak Spanish at home today.

Jul. 29, 2013

What Univision’s milestone says about U.S. demographics

Jul. 22, 2013

Are unauthorized immigrants overwhelmingly Democrats?

Will there be “an electoral bonanza for Democrats” if the nation’s estimated 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants are eventually granted the right to vote? The data provide some insights.

Jun. 27, 2013

If they could, how many unauthorized immigrants would become U.S. citizens?

Jun. 19, 2013

Salvadorans may soon replace Cubans as third-largest U.S. Hispanic group

For more than 40 years, one rock solid element of Hispanic demographics has been the ranking of the three largest Hispanic origin groups: Mexicans have always been the largest by population; followed by Puerto Ricans and then Cubans.

But this may be changing.

Jun. 19, 2013

Latinos’ changing views of same-sex marriage

Latinos’ views of same-sex marriage have changed dramatically in recent years. In 2012 for the first time, more Latinos said they favored same-sex marriage than opposed it (52% versus 34%) according to Pew Hispanic Center surveys.