Gretchen Livingston is a Senior Researcher at the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project. Her primary areas of interest include immigrant adaptation, gender, social networks and family structure. She earned her Ph.D. in Demography and Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, and prior to joining the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project she was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Princeton University Office of Population Research. Read full bio

May. 21, 2015

Americans are aging, but not as fast as people in Germany, Italy and Japan

At least one-in-five people in Japan, Germany and Italy are already aged 65 or older, and most other European countries are close behind.

Mar. 31, 2015

Working while pregnant is much more common than it used to be

The latest figures show that 66% of mothers who gave birth to their first child between 2006 and 2008 worked during pregnancy, up from 44% in the early 1960s.

Feb. 24, 2015

Is U.S. fertility at an all-time low? It depends

There are three main ways to measure fertility. None of them is “right” or “wrong,” but each tells a different story about when births bottomed out.

Jan. 15, 2015

For most highly educated women, motherhood doesn’t start until the 30s

More than half (54%) of mothers near the end of their childbearing years with at least a master’s degree had their first child after their 20s. In fact, one-fifth didn’t become mothers until they were at least 35. Some 28% became moms in their late 20s, and 18% had children earlier in their lives.

Dec. 22, 2014

Less than half of U.S. kids today live in a ‘traditional’ family

Less than half (46%) of U.S. kids younger than 18 years of age are living in a home with two married heterosexual parents in their first marriage, a marked changed from 1960.

Dec. 4, 2014

Tying the knot again? Chances are, there’s a bigger age gap than the first time around

Not only are men who have recently remarried more likely than those beginning a first marriage to have a spouse who is younger; in many cases, she is much younger. Some 20% of men who are newly remarried have a wife who is at least 10 years their junior, and another 18% married a woman who is 6-9 years younger.

Sep. 25, 2014

Texas moms are most likely to give birth in the same state they were born

How common is it for new parents to put down roots in the same areas that they themselves were born? The answer, according to a new Pew Research analysis, depends on which part of the country they hail from.

Aug. 13, 2014

Birth rate for unmarried women declining for first time in decades

For the first time in decades, the non-marital birth rate in the U.S. has been declining. It’s likely that the decline occurred as a result of the economic recession of 2007-2009.

May. 7, 2014

Opting out? About 10% of highly educated moms are staying at home

Among mothers with professional degrees, such as medical degrees, law degrees or nursing degrees, 11% are out of the workforce in order to care for their families, as are 9% of Master’s degree holders and 6% of mothers with a Ph.D.

Apr. 24, 2014

Among Hispanics, immigrants more likely to be stay-at-home moms and to believe that’s best for kids

Views among Hispanics born in the U.S. mirror those of all Americans—about six-in-ten believe that kids are better off if a parent stays home to focus on the family. But a far larger majority—85%–of foreign-born Hispanics say that children are better off if a parent is at home.