D’Vera Cohn is a Senior Writer at the Pew Research Center. She was a Washington Post reporter for 21 years, mainly writing about demographics, and was the newspaper’s lead reporter for the 2000 Census. After leaving the newspaper in 2006, she served as a consultant and freelance writer for the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project, Brookings Institution and Population Reference Bureau. She also has advised the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism on demographic topics, and has spoken at national journalism conferences about how reporters can make use of demographic data in stories. A graduate of Bryn Mawr College, she is a former Nieman Fellow. Read full bio

May. 11, 2015

Census Bureau decides to keep marriage questions on survey

Under pressure from academics and advocates, the U.S. Census Bureau has abandoned plans to delete a series of questions about marriage and divorce from its largest household survey.

Feb. 13, 2015

National Academies: Census survey data should be more user-friendly

The bureau should be paying more attention to the needs and opinions of the people and organizations that use its data, according to a recent report.

Dec. 17, 2014

Census Bureau proposes dropping some marriage and divorce questions

The U.S. Census Bureau has proposed dropping a series of questions about marriage and divorce from its largest household survey of Americans, touching off a debate about the usefulness of such data.

Dec. 9, 2014

How the 1986 immigration law compares with Obama’s program

As the federal government gears up to offer deportation relief to about 4 million unauthorized immigrants, it’s worth looking back to 1986, when a new law established what was then the biggest legalization and citizenship process in U.S. history.

Sep. 22, 2014

Census confirms more data problems in sorting out the number of U.S. gay marriages

The Census Bureau last week released a new estimate of the number of U.S. same-sex married couples that is 38% higher than the bureau’s 2012 estimate, but agency officials note that the estimates are likely inaccurate.

Sep. 19, 2014

Census: Computer ownership, internet connection varies widely across U.S.

Nearly 25 years after the birth of the world wide web, most Americans have computers and internet access, but the nation remains a patchwork of connectivity, with some metro areas full of high-speed connections and others much less plugged in.

Sep. 18, 2014

For first time, census data on married couples includes same-sex spouses

Census Bureau officials and other experts do not expect counting same-sex spouses along with all other married couples to make a big impact on overall statistics for married couples. But if the number of same-sex married couples continues to rise, that could change.

Jun. 26, 2014

Falloff in births slows shift to a majority-minority youth population

The sharp decline in U.S. births after the onset of the Great Recession—especially among Hispanics—has slowed the nation’s transition to a majority-minority youth population.

Jun. 4, 2014

Are minority births the majority yet?

Two years ago, the Census Bureau announced the nation had reached a new demographic tipping point. But new data shows that tipping point may not have arrived yet.

May. 29, 2014

Census says it will count same-sex marriages, but with caveats

The new approach reflects the bureau’s evolving policy on reporting household relationships, as it tries to keep pace with social change.