D’Vera Cohn is a senior writer and editor at Pew Research Center. She was a Washington Post reporter for 21 years, mainly writing about demographics, and was the newspaper’s lead reporter for the 2000 Census. After leaving the newspaper in 2006, she served as a consultant and freelance writer for the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project, Brookings Institution and Population Reference Bureau. She also has advised the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism on demographic topics, and has spoken at national journalism conferences about how reporters can make use of demographic data in stories. A graduate of Bryn Mawr College, she is a former Nieman Fellow. Read full bio

Jul. 22, 2015

Unauthorized immigrant population stable for half a decade

An estimated 11.3 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the U.S. in 2014. This population has remained essentially stable for five years after nearly two decades of changes

Jun. 24, 2015

How many same-sex married couples in the U.S.? Maybe 170,000

A new research paper suggests that the number of married same-sex couples in the United States in 2013 may have been much lower than the Census Bureau’s initial estimate for that year.

Jun. 18, 2015

Census considers new approach to asking about race – by not using the term at all

Instead, the new census questionnaire may tell people to check the “categories” that describe them.

Jun. 17, 2015

Share of births to unmarried women dips, reversing a long trend

In 2014, 40% of births were to unmarried mothers, a slight decline from the 41% share that had held steady since 2008. Although the single percentage point drop in 2014 was small, it was only the third one-year dip in this measure since the end of World War II.

Jun. 11, 2015

American Indian and white, but not ‘multiracial’

Biracial adults who are white and American Indian are among the least likely of mixed-race adults to consider themselves multiracial (only 25% do). They are among the most likely to say their multiracial background has been neither an advantage nor a disadvantage.

May. 11, 2015

Census Bureau decides to keep marriage questions on survey

Under pressure from academics and advocates, the U.S. Census Bureau has abandoned plans to delete a series of questions about marriage and divorce from its largest household survey.

Feb. 13, 2015

National Academies: Census survey data should be more user-friendly

The bureau should be paying more attention to the needs and opinions of the people and organizations that use its data, according to a recent report.

Dec. 17, 2014

Census Bureau proposes dropping some marriage and divorce questions

The U.S. Census Bureau has proposed dropping a series of questions about marriage and divorce from its largest household survey of Americans, touching off a debate about the usefulness of such data.

Dec. 9, 2014

How the 1986 immigration law compares with Obama’s program

As the federal government gears up to offer deportation relief to about 4 million unauthorized immigrants, it’s worth looking back to 1986, when a new law established what was then the biggest legalization and citizenship process in U.S. history.

Sep. 22, 2014

Census confirms more data problems in sorting out the number of U.S. gay marriages

The Census Bureau last week released a new estimate of the number of U.S. same-sex married couples that is 38% higher than the bureau’s 2012 estimate, but agency officials note that the estimates are likely inaccurate.