report | Jan 5, 2011

The 2010 Congressional Reapportionment and Latinos

Hispanic voters are nearly three times more prevalent in states that gained congressional seats and Electoral College votes in the 2010 reapportionment than they are in states that lost seats.

report | May 13, 2010

Census Data Point to Low Hispanic GED Attainment

Among Americans who have not obtained a regular high school diploma, Hispanics are less likely than members of other major U.S. race and ethnic groups to acquire a General Educational Development (GED) credential.

report | May 13, 2010

Hispanics, High School Dropouts and the GED

Just one-in-ten Hispanic high school drop-outs has a General Educational Development (GED) credential, widely regarded as the best “second chance” pathway to college, vocational training and military service for adults who do not graduate high school.

report | May 13, 2010

Hispanics, High School Dropouts and the GED

Just one-in-ten Hispanic high school drop-outs has a General Educational Development (GED) credential, widely regarded as the best “second chance” pathway to college, vocational training and military service for adults who do not graduate high school.

report | Dec 11, 2009

Latino Youths Optimistic But Beset by Problems

A national survey finds that Latinos from ages 16 to 25 are satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They value education, hard work and career success. But they are more likely than other youths to drop out of school, live in poverty and become teen parents.

report | Oct 15, 2009

Updated Demographic Profiles of U.S. Hispanics by Country of Origin

Five demographic profiles of Hispanic populations in the U.S. by country of origin -- Guatemalan, Colombian, Honduran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian -- have been added to the profiles of the five largest Hispanic populations -- Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, and Dominican -- posted earlier in the year by the Pew Hispanic Center.

report | Oct 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) Latino young adults ages 16 to 25 say that a college education is important for success in life, yet only about half that number-48%-say that they themselves plan to get a college degree.

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