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Short Read | Oct 16, 2014
What is the greatest threat to the world? Depends on where you live

Prior to the most recent Ebola outbreak in the western parts of the continent, a median of 32% across the seven African nations polled feared infectious disease as the top danger. In the Middle East, the top danger is ethnic and religious hatred.

Feature | Oct 16, 2014
Greatest Dangers in the World

Our 2014 Global Attitudes survey in 44 countries asked which among five dangers was considered to be the “greatest threat to the world.” Many in the Middle East said religious and ethnic hatred was the greatest threat, while Europeans tended to choose inequality. Africans are more concerned with AIDS and other infectious diseases, while scattered countries, many with good reason, chose the spread of nuclear weapons or pollution and environmental problems as the top danger.

Short Read | May 16, 2014
Chart of the Week: Who really drinks the most?

The countries with the highest per-capita alcohol consumption don't, as a rule, have the heaviest drinkers. Those tend to be in countries where alcohol is forbidden or strongly discouraged.

Report | May 1, 2014
Public Health a Major Priority in African Nations

Survey Report Concerns about public health are widespread in sub-Saharan Africa, and there is considerable support in the region for making public health challenges a top national priority. In particular, people want their governments to improve the quality of hospitals and other health care facilities and deal with the problem of HIV/AIDS. A Pew Research […]

Report | Jul 23, 2009
Confidence in Obama Lifts U.S. Image Around the World

The image of the United States has improved markedly in most parts of the world reflecting global confidence in Barack Obama. In many countries, opinions of the U.S. are now about as positive as they were at the beginning of the decade before George W. Bush took office.

Report | May 28, 2009
Swine Flu Coverage around the World

The swine flu story quickly topped the American media agenda when the story broke in late April. How did coverage in other countries compare with the U.S.? Was there any correlation between the number of confirmed cases and quantity or nature of coverage? How did Spanish-language media in the U.S. react? A new report examining press coverage of the outbreak in several countries offers answers.

Report | Jan 31, 2003
Bush Targets Top Global Problem – AIDS

With his decision to dramatically increase U.S. overseas spending on the AIDS epidemic, President Bush is addressing a crisis that dominates the concerns of people around the world. The spread of AIDS and other infectious diseases is not just a major crisis in Africa, where the toll from AIDS has been highest. Majorities in 31 […]

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