HispanicDec 6, 2007

Hispanics and the 2008 Election: A Swing Vote?

Earlier Republican Party gains among Latinos have dissipated in the past year, a new Pew Hispanic Center survey finds. Hispanics also comprise a sizable share of voters in four “swing states” that President Bush narrowly carried in 2004.

U.S. PoliticsDec 4, 2007

GOP Race Unsettled in Politically Diverse Early States

Likely Republican voters in the three politically disparate early primary states express less enthusiasm about their field of presidential candidates, and many voice only modest support for their choices.

U.S. PoliticsDec 3, 2007

Clinton Pressed in Iowa, But Holds Solid Leads Elsewhere

Democrats enter the presidential primary campaign upbeat about their candidates and united in their views on major issues. Sen. Hillary Clinton is the Democratic frontrunner in three key early primary states, holding a slim five-point edge in Iowa and more substantial 19-point and 14-point leads in New Hampshire and South Carolina, respectively.

U.S. PoliticsOct 31, 2007

A Year Ahead, Republicans Face Tough Political Terrain

A year before the 2008 presidential election, most major national opinion trends decidedly favor the Democrats and discontent with the state of the nation is markedly greater than it was four years ago. Also, Republicans have become less likely to say that their party is doing a good job standing up for its traditional positions.

U.S. PoliticsAug 23, 2007

A Study in Contrasts: Clinton and Guiliani

Sen. Hillary Clinton is by far the most popular presidential candidate among her own party’s voters, but among the general public, she has one of the lowest favorable ratings of the leading candidates. In sharp contrast, the front-running Republican candidate, Rudy Giuliani, evokes relatively modest enthusiasm from the GOP base, but is as broadly popular with all voters as any candidate in either party.

ReligionAug 21, 2007

Religion and the Presidential Vote: A Tale of Two Gaps

An analysis of national exit polls from 2004 shows there is not one but two religion gaps — one based on religious affiliation and the other based on frequency of attendance at worship services. How did the gaps manifest themselves in the 2004 election and what are the possible implications for 2008?

U.S. PoliticsAug 2, 2007

A Summer of Discontent with Washington

All three branches of the federal government are under fire from the American public. Just 29% approve of President Bush’s job performance while the proportion with a favorable view of Congress has declined 12 percentage points since January. Even favorable opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court have fallen, from 72% in January to 57% currently.

Pew Research CenterJul 19, 2007

2008 May Come Down to Ohio — Again

In his first column for Stateline.org, journalist Louis Jacobson samples the presidential leanings of the 19 “purple” states that are neither Republican “red” nor Democratic “blue.” Despite consistent Democratic leads in national polling, election 2008 appears to be just as close as were the 2000 and 2004 elections for the White House.

U.S. PoliticsApr 26, 2007

Campaign ’08: Analysis of Key Voter Groups

Who’s most inspiring? Who’s most electable? Find out how liberals and conservatives, war supporters and opponents and other segments of the electorate rate the presidential candidates. Also, a solid majority of the public favors troop withdrawal, but both sides reject compromise over Iraq funding.

U.S. PoliticsFeb 23, 2007

Voters Remain In Neutral As Presidential Campaign Moves Into High Gear

Latest Pew poll finds Republicans lagging Democrats in attention to the race and enthusiasm for candidates. Clinton is Democrats’ strongest choice but Obama leads among independents; Giuliani tops McCain in popularity among Republicans and independents.