Apr. 30, 2014

5 facts about the modern American family

In 1960, 37% of households included a married couple raising their own children. More than a half-century later, just 16% of households look like that.

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Pew Research Center Apr. 10, 2014

The Next America

America is in the midst of two major changes to its population: We are becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray. Explore these shifts in our new interactive data essay.

Fact Tank Nov. 12, 2013

What happens when Jews intermarry?

Does intermarriage lead to assimilation and weaken the Jewish community? Or does it strengthen and diversify the Jewish community?

Religion Oct. 1, 2013

A Portrait of Jewish Americans

American Jews overwhelmingly say they are proud to be Jewish and have a strong sense of belonging to the Jewish people, but their identity is also changing: 22% of American Jews now say they have no religion.

Religion Jul. 19, 2012

Asian Americans and Religion

As their numbers rise, Asian Americans have been largely responsible for the growth of non-Abrahamic faiths in the U.S., particularly Buddhism and Hinduism. At the same time, most Asian Americans belong to the country’s two largest religious groups: Christians and people who say they have no particular religious affiliation.

Feb. 16, 2012

The Rise of Intermarriage

Marriage across racial and ethnic lines continues to be on the rise in the United States. The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity increased to 15.1 % in 2010, and the share of all current marriages that are either interracial or interethnic has reached an all-time high of 8.4%.

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Jun. 4, 2010

Map: Interracial Marriage: Who and Where

In 2008, a record 14.6% of all new marriages in the United States were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from one another. Rates varied by region, by state and racial group.

Jun. 4, 2010

Marrying Out

A record 14.6% of all new marriages in the U.S in 2008 were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from one another, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of new census data. Of all newlyweds in 2008, 9% of whites, 16% of blacks, 26% of Hispanics and 31% of Asians married outside their race/ethnicity. Patterns also varied by region (intermarriage is most common in the West) and by gender.

U.S. Politics Feb. 1, 2010

Almost All Millennials Accept Interracial Dating and Marriage

Compared with older groups, particularly Americans ages 50 or older, younger Americans are significantly more likely to be accepting of interracial marriage and are more likely to have friends of a different race.

Religion Jun. 5, 2009

Brides, Grooms Often Have Different Faiths

Buddhists and the religiously unaffiliated are the most likely to have a spouse or partner with a different religious background, while Mormons and Hindus are the least likely to marry or live with a partner outside their own faith.