Pew Research CenterOctober 18, 2018

‘Defining the universe’ is essential when writing about survey data

Given the wide range of people we speak to for our polls – and the issues we ask them about – it’s important to be as clear as possible about exactly who says what. In research circles, this practice is sometimes called “defining the universe.”

Pew Research CenterAugust 6, 2018

What are nonprobability surveys?

Many online surveys are conducted using “nonprobability” or “opt-in” samples, which are generally easier and cheaper to conduct. In our latest Methods 101 video, we explore some of the features of nonprobability surveys and how they differ from traditional probability-based polls.

Pew Research CenterMay 14, 2018

Can we still trust polls?

Donald Trump’s victory in 2016 and the U.K. “Brexit” decision rattled public confidence in polls. Our new video explains why well-designed polls can be trusted.

Pew Research CenterApril 19, 2018

Q&A: How Pew Research Center identified bots on Twitter

For a recent study on automated accounts and Twitter, we had to answer a fundamental question: Which accounts are bots and which accounts aren’t? Read a Q&A with Stefan Wojcik, a computational social scientist at the Center and one of the report’s authors, on how he and his colleagues navigated this question.

Pew Research CenterApril 9, 2018

5 things to know about bots on Twitter

Read key findings and watch a video about our new study on how bot accounts affect the mix of content on Twitter.

Pew Research CenterMarch 21, 2018

How do you write survey questions that accurately measure public opinion?

In the second video from our Methods 101 series, we’re tackling why question wording is so important in public opinion surveys.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 15, 2018

Q&A: The growing use of ‘voter files’ in studying the U.S. electorate

Read a Q&A with Pew Research Center’s Ruth Igielnik and Scott Keeter about a recent study about voter files.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 6, 2018

Use of election forecasts in campaign coverage can confuse voters and may lower turnout

Probability forecasts have gained prominence in recent years. But these forecasts may confuse potential voters and may even lower the likelihood that they vote.

September 27, 2017

Many poll respondents guess wrong on their interviewer’s race or ethnicity

Establishing the interviewer’s perceived race or ethnicity is essential to understanding how it might affect the respondent’s answers to survey questions.

Pew Research CenterAugust 21, 2017

Highly ideological members of Congress have more Facebook followers than moderates do

In both legislative chambers, members’ ideology is a strong predictor of the number of people who follow them on Facebook.