Pew Research CenterOctober 6, 2017

A closer look at who does (and doesn’t) pay U.S. income tax

Taxpayers with incomes of $200,000 or more paid well over half (58.8%) of federal income taxes, though they accounted for only 4.5% of all returns filed (6.8% of all taxable returns). By contrast, taxpayers with incomes below $30,000 filed nearly 44% of all returns but paid just 1.4% of all federal income tax.

GlobalSeptember 19, 2017

5 facts about government debt around the world

Public debt has increased sharply in many countries in recent years, particularly during and after the Great Recession.

U.S. PoliticsSeptember 15, 2017

Proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution seldom go anywhere

More than 700 proposed amendments have been introduced into the House or Senate since 1999, but not one has become part of the Constitution.

U.S. PoliticsAugust 29, 2017

Congressional productivity is up – but many new laws overturn Obama-era rules

This Congress has passed more substantive bills so far in its session than any since 2007 – though nearly a third of them were to undo Obama-era rules.

Pew Research CenterAugust 17, 2017

5 facts about the national debt

As of July 31, the federal government’s total debt stands at $19.845 trillion. Read a primer on the U.S. national debt, the debt limit and interest payments on the nation’s credit line.

Pew Research CenterJuly 25, 2017

Most Americans unaware that as U.S. manufacturing jobs have disappeared, output has grown

Although manufacturing jobs have fallen over the past three decades, improved productivity has kept manufacturing output rising – contrary to what many Americans believe. But over the past few years, productivity growth has been sluggish at best.

Pew Research CenterJuly 13, 2017

U.S. House seats rarely flip to other party in special elections

Special elections to the U.S. House of Representatives tend to be low-turnout events, historically speaking, and seldom result in seats switching from one party to another.

GlobalJune 27, 2017

People’s views of their national economies don’t always square with data

Many Europeans, Japanese and Americans feel better today about their nations’ economies than they did before the financial crisis, according to a new global survey by Pew Research Center. But those public sentiments aren’t always aligned with a nation’s actual economic performance.

Pew Research CenterJune 7, 2017

U.S. job openings at record high levels

In April, there were more than 6 million nonfarm job openings, according to the federal government’s Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey.

U.S. PoliticsJune 1, 2017

Trump’s nominees have already faced a large number of cloture votes

The president has been slow to nominate people to fill key posts, and most of those he has named have had to overcome the cloture hurdle before being confirmed.