Around half of U.S. adults say the U.S. should pay less attention to problems overseas and concentrate on problems at home, while nearly as many say it’s best for the future of the country to be active in world affairs.

Views on this question have changed little over the past three years, despite the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the COVID-19 pandemic and the shifting list of global issues that Americans perceive as major threats to their country.

There are significant differences by age in Americans’ attitudes about whether the U.S. should focus more on domestic problems or be more internationally active. Majorities of adults under age 50 say the U.S. should concentrate on domestic problems, while those ages 50 to 64 are nearly evenly divided and around six-in-ten of those 65 and older say it’s better for the U.S. to be active in world affairs.

Opinions also vary markedly by party. Democrats and independents who lean toward the Democratic Party are nearly twice as likely as Republicans and independents who lean toward the Republican Party (60% vs. 34%) to say it’s best for the future of the U.S. to be active in world affairs.