Hispanic Mar. 10, 2011

New Jobs in Recession and Recovery: Who Are Getting Them and Who Are Not

In testimony before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement, the Pew Hispanic Center’s Rakesh Kochhar explains why for the first time since the official end of the Great Recession in June 2009, native-born workers in the second half of 2010 joined foreign-born workers in experiencing the beginnings of a recovery in employment.

U.S. Politics Mar. 7, 2011

Who’s Winning the Fight Over Public-Employee Unions?

In its Topic A feature, the Washington Post asked several experts — among them the Pew Research Center’s Director of Survey Research Scott Keeter — who’s winning and who’s losing in the fight over public-employee unions.

U.S. Politics Feb. 28, 2011

Wisconsin Unions Favored Over Walker in Showdown

By a 42%-31% margin, the public sides with public employee unions in their dispute with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. At the federal level, President Obama and GOP leaders would share blame for a government shutdown.

U.S. Politics Feb. 22, 2011

In Showdown with Air Traffic Controllers, the Public Sided with Reagan

The bitter fight over union rights in Wisconsin calls to mind a labor battle that helped define the first year of Ronald Reagan’s presidency.

Hispanic Feb. 17, 2011

Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States, 2009

This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2009 American Community Survey.

U.S. Politics Feb. 17, 2011

Labor Unions: Good for Workers, Not for U.S. Competitiveness

Favorability ratings for labor unions remain at nearly their lowest level in a quarter century with virtually no differences in opinions about private and public sector unions. Yet the public now expresses similar opinions about business corporations whose rating is also near a historic low.

Hispanic Feb. 1, 2011

Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010

As of March 2010, 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants were living in the U.S., virtually unchanged from a year earlier and remaining well below the population’s peak of 12 million in 2007. The number of unauthorized immigrants in the nation’s workforce (8 million) also has not changed in the past year.

U.S. Politics Dec. 15, 2010

For the Public, a Tough Year Ends on a Down Note

Consistent with the mood of the nation all year, 2010 is closing on a down note — but not as low as in December 2008. Fully 72% are dissatisfied with national conditions, 89% rate national economic conditions as only fair or poor, and majorities or pluralities think the country is losing ground on nine of 12 major issues.

Hispanic Oct. 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

Immigrants are gaining jobs at a time when native-born workers continue to sustain losses. Foreign-born workers job gains may be the result of greater flexibility with regard to wages and hours of work or greater mobility. But despite rising employment, immigrants have experienced a sharp decline in earnings as well as a still substantial net loss in jobs.

Hispanic Oct. 28, 2010

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

About four-in-five of the nation’s estimated 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants are of Hispanic origin; a new national survey finds that Latinos are divided over what to do with these immigrants.