Hispanic Aug. 10, 2006

Does Immigration Hurt U.S. Workers?

One of the questions at the heart of the immigration policy debate is whether the influx of workers from abroad hurts the employment prospects of U.S.-born workers. But it’s a question with no simple answers, according to our analysis of state level employment data.

Hispanic Aug. 10, 2006

Growth in the Foreign-Born Workforce and Employment of the Native Born

Rapid increases in the foreign-born population at the state level are not associated with negative effects on the employment of native-born workers, according to a study by the Pew Hispanic Center.

U.S. Politics Apr. 18, 2006

Maximum Support for Raising the Minimum

Republican or Democrat, rich or poor, north, east, south or west, the U.S. public says it’s time for a big boost for the lowest paid.

Hispanic Mar. 30, 2006

America’s Immigration Quandary

A growing number of Americans believe that immigrants are a burden to the country, taking jobs and housing and creating strains on the health care system. Many people also worry about the cultural impact of the expanding number of newcomers in the U.S.

U.S. Politics Mar. 28, 2006

Pinched Pocketbooks

Beyond partisanship — and behind those healthy economic indicators — Americans may be seeing something that most economists overlook.

Hispanic Mar. 28, 2006

The Complex Tapestry of the Undocumented

Ubiquitous as they are in the public debate over immigration, day laborers are only one part of a diverse population of unauthorized migrants

Hispanic Mar. 7, 2006

Unauthorized Migrants Number 11.5-12 Million

The population of unauthorized migrants in the U.S. is between 11.5 million and 12 million, according to a new report from the Pew Hispanic Center.

Feb. 28, 2006

Who’s Feeling Rushed?

If you want to find out who’s always feeling starved for time, just ask a working mom.

Hispanic Dec. 15, 2005

The Occupational Status and Mobility of Hispanics

Hispanics and whites perform different types of work in the labor market. Moreover, the occupational divide between the two largest segments of the labor force appears to be widening. The occupations in which Hispanics are concentrated rank low in wages, educational requirements and other indicators of socioeconomic status.