MethodsOctober 9, 2018

Comparing Survey Sampling Strategies: Random-Digit Dial vs. Voter Files

A new telephone survey experiment finds that an opinion poll drawn from a commercial voter file produces results similar to those from a sample based on random-digit dialing.

Pew Research CenterAugust 6, 2018

What are nonprobability surveys?

Many online surveys are conducted using “nonprobability” or “opt-in” samples, which are generally easier and cheaper to conduct. In our latest Methods 101 video, we explore some of the features of nonprobability surveys and how they differ from traditional probability-based polls.

MethodsAugust 6, 2018

Video Explainer: What are nonprobability surveys?

Our latest Methods 101 video explores some of the ways these surveys differ from traditional probability-based polls.

ReligionJuly 5, 2018

How Does Pew Research Center Measure the Religious Composition of the U.S.? Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

At Pew Research Center, we frequently receive questions about how we measure religion. Here are answers to some of the questions we get most frequently.

MethodsMarch 21, 2018

Video Explainer: Understanding survey question wording

The second video in Pew Research Center’s “Methods 101” series helps explain question wording – a concept at the center of sound public opinion survey research – and why it’s important.

MethodsJanuary 26, 2018

For Weighting Online Opt-In Samples, What Matters Most?

A growing share of polling is conducted with online opt-in, or nonprobability, samples. This trend has raised some concern within the industry because, while low participation rates pose a challenge for all surveys, the online opt-in variety face additional hurdles.

Internet & TechDecember 1, 2017

First-time internet users: Who they are and what they do when they get online

Having access to the internet did not lead to more online exploration for some new internet users, and some had difficulties with the tablets.

MethodsAugust 4, 2017

Personal finance questions elicit slightly different answers in phone surveys than online

People polled by telephone are slightly less likely than those interviewed online to say their personal finances are in “poor shape.”

Media & NewsJune 20, 2017

Few mode effects found when Americans are asked about their news consumption habits

A new analysis sheds light on concerns raised among pollsters that the medium by which a survey question is asked – its mode – can affect responses.

MethodsMay 12, 2017

How can a survey of 1,000 people tell you what the whole U.S. thinks?

The first video in our “Methods 101” series is about random sampling, a concept that undergirds all probability-based survey research. Here’s how it works.