Pew Research CenterApril 17, 2012

With Voters Focused on Economy, Obama Lead Narrows

As voters continue to focus on the economy and jobs as top issues, Barack Obama’s lead over Mitt Romney has narrowed from a 12-point advantage last month to a slim 49% to 45% advantage. Neither candidate has a clear advantage on on the economy or jobs issues, which more than eight-in-ten voters cited as “very important” to their choice.

Pew Research CenterMarch 29, 2012

The Gender Gap: Three Decades Old, as Wide as Ever

Barack Obama’s advantages among women voters over his GOP rivals are striking, with women favoring Obama over Mitt Romney by 20 points and over Rick Santorum by 26 points. When it comes to the political parties, 51% of women identify with the Democrats compared to 42% of men.

Pew Research CenterDecember 15, 2011

Frustration with Congress Could Hurt Republican Incumbents

Public discontent with Congress has reached record levels, and the implications for incumbents in next year’s elections could be stark. The Republican Party is taking more of the blame than the Democrats for a do-nothing Congress.

Pew Research CenterAugust 25, 2011

Obama Leadership Image Takes a Hit, GOP Ratings Decline

For the first time in his presidency, significantly more Americans disapprove than approve of the way Barack Obama is handling his job as president and and the margin of strong disapproval over strong approval has widened. But the public is also profoundly discontented with the political leadership of both parties, angry at the federal government and dissatisfied with the way things are going in the country.

Pew Research CenterNovember 3, 2010

A Clear Rejection of the Status Quo, No Consensus about Future Policies

An older and much more conservative electorate than in 2006 and 2008 propelled the Republican Party to a broad victory in the 2010 midterm elections. But the vote was more repudiation than endorsement. Views of the Republican Party are no more positive than those of the Democratic Party.

Pew Research CenterOctober 31, 2010

GOP Likely to Capture Control of House

Republicans continue to hold a solid lead in preferences for Tuesday’s midterm elections among likely voters — enough so as to suggest they will win control of the House. The GOP owes its lead to strong backing from independents and record-levels of engagement among its partisans.

Pew Research CenterOctober 21, 2010

Democrats Stirring but Fail to Match GOP Support, Engagement

As the 2010 midterm elections near, Republican engagement and enthusiasm continue at record levels, outpacing even improved Democratic showings on these indicators. The growing popularity of early voting — about a quarter of voters nationally say they plan to vote before Election Day — gives Democrats less time to make up ground and there is no indication that their voter mobilization efforts are outmatching Republican efforts.

Pew Research CenterOctober 6, 2010

Possible Negatives for Candidates: Vote for Bank Bailout, Palin Support

Two factors have emerged as major potential negatives for congressional candidates: TARP and Sarah Palin. Americans are split over whether they are more likely to vote for candidates who supported the health care law.

Pew Research CenterOctober 5, 2010

Latinos and the 2010 Elections

In a year when support for Democratic candidates has eroded, the party’s standing among Latinos appears as strong as ever. However, Hispanic voters appear to be less motivated than others to go to the polls.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 23, 2010

Independents Oppose Party in Power … Again

For the third national election in a row, independent voters may be poised to vote out the party in power. Political independents now favor GOP candidates by about as large a margin as they backed Barack Obama in 2008. The “independent vote,” however, is in no way monolithic; this is not surprising given that most independents are recent refugees from the two major parties.