Pew Research Center May. 19, 2008

Oregon: The Vote is in the Mail

The state’s election officials’ biggest concern in this year’s May 20 primary was whether voters would remember that the price of a stamp went up a penny on May 12, just as they began mailing back their ballots.

Hispanic Mar. 7, 2008

Hispanics Give Clinton Crucial Wins

Latino voters lopsided support for Hillary Clinton more than accounted for her margin of victory in Texas, California and New Mexico.

U.S. Politics Jan. 10, 2008

Getting It Wrong

Several factors deserve exploration, but one should not ignore the possibility of the longstanding pattern of pre-election polls overstating support for black candidates among white voters, particularly white voters who are poor.

U.S. Politics Dec. 14, 2007

Primary Problems: How Exit Pollsters Plan to Cope with a Super-Crowded Election Season

From holiday distractions to winter weather, the people who will be measuring voters’ preferences in primaries and caucuses around the nation will be dealing with unprecedented problems. Here’s how they plan to do it.

U.S. Politics Dec. 7, 2007

The Courting of Iowa and New Hampshire: Many are Robo-Called but Fewer Are Listening

Voters, especially Democrats, in two early primary states are being inundated with phone calls, mail and other campaign contacts; but so far there are few signs of campaign fatigue.

Hispanic Dec. 6, 2007

Hispanics and the 2008 Election: A Swing Vote?

Earlier Republican Party gains among Latinos have dissipated in the past year, a new Pew Hispanic Center survey finds. Hispanics also comprise a sizable share of voters in four “swing states” that President Bush narrowly carried in 2004.

Hispanic Jul. 24, 2007

The Latino Electorate: A Widening Gap between Voters and the Larger Hispanic Population in the U.S.

Latinos made up a slightly larger share of the total voter turnout in the 2006 election than in 2002; but, a new Pew Hispanic analysis finds, the Latino vote continued to lag well behind growth of the Latino population primarily because a high percentage of the new Hispanics in the U.S. are either too young to vote or are not citizens.

Hispanic Nov. 27, 2006

Parsing the ’06 Latino Vote

Widely cited findings from the national exit polls suggest Latinos tilted heavily Democratic in the 2006 election, taking back most of the support they had granted the Republicans just two years earlier. Does that mean the Latinos who flirted with the Republican Party are now firmly back in the Democratic camp?

U.S. Politics Oct. 18, 2006

Who Votes, Who Doesn’t and Why

A new survey finds large differences between Americans who are not registered to vote or vote only rarely and those who cast ballots at least some of the time. These two groups at the bottom of the voting participation scale are much less likely than regular or intermittent voters to believe that voting will make much of a difference.

U.S. Politics Oct. 11, 2006

November Turnout May Be High

Unlike the past three mid-term election campaigns, Democrats are more enthusiastic than Republicans about voting this year.