Pew Research CenterAugust 11, 2010

Religion in the 2008 Presidential Election

An analysis of newly released exit poll data finds that Barack Obama succeeded in attracting a larger share of the vote among some religious groups than John Kerry did in 2004. The contours of religion and politics, however, were largely the same in 2008 as in 2004.

Pew Research CenterAugust 10, 2010

The Vote for Congress: GOP Fares Better with Whites, Men, Independents and Seniors

While voter preferences for the midterm elections remain closely divided, Republicans now enjoy advantages among typically loyal voting blocs that wavered in 2006 and are doing better with key swing groups. Americans who intend to vote GOP this fall are also far more engaged in the campaign this year.

Pew Research CenterJune 3, 2010

Seniors are Strongest Advocates for Change in 2010

Older Americans have a more negative view of incumbents, are more likely to vote for a candidate with no elective experience and less likely to support those who compromise than are Americans younger than age 65.

Pew Research CenterMarch 11, 2010

Millennials, the Midterms and the Political Landscape Beyond

At a conference at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2010, Pew Research Center analysts and outside experts discussed research findings about the Millennial generation, the American teens and twenty-somethings now making the passage into adulthood. The last of three sessions addressed the question of whether Millennials, who rocked the vote in 2008, will show up at the polls this November and how they may shape the political landscape beyond?

Pew Research CenterDecember 8, 2009

A Look at Religious Voters in the 2008 Election

Two experts examine the role that religion played in the 2008 presidential election and discuss implications for the future.

Pew Research CenterApril 30, 2009

Dissecting the 2008 Electorate: Most Diverse in U.S. History

The electorate in last year’s presidential election was the most racially and ethnically diverse in U.S. history, with nearly one-in-four votes cast by non-whites, according to a new analysis of Census Bureau data.

Pew Research CenterApril 30, 2009

Dissecting the 2008 Electorate: Most Diverse in U.S. History

Demographic changes in America have increased the number of eligible non-white voters, but the racial and ethnic diversity of last year’s electorate was also driven by substantially higher levels of participation by black, Hispanic and Asian voters.

Pew Research CenterMarch 18, 2009

Reluctant Suffragettes: When Women Questioned Their Right to Vote

An 86-year-old polling analysis sheds light on why female Americans were slow to appreciate the fruits of the suffragettes’ hard-fought 70-year battle for access to the ballot box.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 15, 2009

Hispanics and the New Administration: Immigration Slips as a Priority

Latinos, who heavily supported Obama in the November election, rate such issues as the economy, health care and education as the more important issues facing the country. Hispanics were more likely to be first time voters than the general public.

Pew Research CenterDecember 8, 2008

Some Final Thoughts on Campaign ’08

A wrap-up of possibly overlooked polling trends and end-of-campaign happenings.