Religion Aug. 21, 2007

Religion and the Presidential Vote: A Tale of Two Gaps

An analysis of national exit polls from 2004 shows there is not one but two religion gaps — one based on religious affiliation and the other based on frequency of attendance at worship services. How did the gaps manifest themselves in the 2004 election and what are the possible implications for 2008?

Hispanic Jul. 24, 2007

The Latino Electorate: A Widening Gap between Voters and the Larger Hispanic Population in the U.S.

Latinos made up a slightly larger share of the total voter turnout in the 2006 election than in 2002; but, a new Pew Hispanic analysis finds, the Latino vote continued to lag well behind growth of the Latino population primarily because a high percentage of the new Hispanics in the U.S. are either too young to vote or are not citizens.

Religion Jun. 6, 2007

¡Here Come ’Los Evangélicos’!

Next week’s National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast in Washington, D.C. illustrates the growing presence and increasing political influence of Latino evangelicals. If Republicans have a prayer of making deep inroads into the Hispanic community, evangelicals may well provide their most direct route.

U.S. Politics Apr. 26, 2007

Campaign ’08: Analysis of Key Voter Groups

Who’s most inspiring? Who’s most electable? Find out how liberals and conservatives, war supporters and opponents and other segments of the electorate rate the presidential candidates. Also, a solid majority of the public favors troop withdrawal, but both sides reject compromise over Iraq funding.

Religion Dec. 5, 2006

Religion’s Role in the 2006 Election

Pew Forum Senior Fellow John Green and American Enterprise Institute Resident Fellow Karlyn Bowman analyze polling data to address such issues as whether Democrats closed the “God gap,” which religious groups were “in play” this election, and whether or not religion polarizes voters.

Religion Nov. 27, 2006

Religious Groups React to the 2006 Election

The religious divide in voting that has characterized American politics over the last several elections largely persisted in the 2006 election. But people in most religious groups say they are happy that the Democrats won.

Hispanic Nov. 27, 2006

Parsing the ’06 Latino Vote

Widely cited findings from the national exit polls suggest Latinos tilted heavily Democratic in the 2006 election, taking back most of the support they had granted the Republicans just two years earlier. Does that mean the Latinos who flirted with the Republican Party are now firmly back in the Democratic camp?

U.S. Politics Nov. 16, 2006

Election ’06: Big Changes in Some Key Groups

In the aftermath of the 2006 election, the shifting allegiance of some important voter groups has gotten relatively little attention. One of the biggest stories is about young people. Another is what really happened to “The God Gap.” And a third is about the one-fifth of voters who aren’t white.

Pew Research Center Nov. 14, 2006

Democrats Made Gains in All Regions of the Country

With roughly 95% of the votes tallied so far in House races across the country, the overall partisan breakdown is 52% for Democratic candidates, 46% for Republican candidates and 2% for others. In actual votes, Democratic House candidates in 2006 have already tallied nearly 5 million more votes than they did in 2002, while the Republican tally is down more than 3 million from four years ago.

U.S. Politics Nov. 8, 2006

Centrists Deliver for Democrats

The key to the strong Democratic showing yesterday was the support their candidates drew from moderate and independent voters, an analysis of the exit polls shows. With more than nine-in-ten Republicans and Democrats casting ballots for representatives of their parties, just as they did two years ago, the Democrats’ 57%-39% advantage among independents proved crucial.