Religion Apr. 25, 2007

Changing Faiths: Latinos and the Transformation of American Religion

Hispanics are altering the profile of American religion by their growing numbers and by their distinctive practice of Christianity. A new study by the Pew Hispanic Center and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life also finds Latinos’ influence on U.S. politics and public affairs is strongly affected by the particular characteristics of their faith.

U.S. Politics Apr. 12, 2007

Money Walks

The Republican Party has traditionally garnered it strongest backing from wealthier voters. But the recent overall decline in Republican Party affiliation nationwide has taken a toll even on GOP support among affluent voters.

U.S. Politics Mar. 29, 2007

Democrats Fail to Impress in First 100 Days

As the Democratic-led Congress approaches the 100-day mark, pluralities approve of House Speaker Pelosi’s and Senate Majority Leader Reid’s leadership. But Democrats get mixed reviews on campaign promises and policies and proposals.

U.S. Politics Mar. 22, 2007

Trends in Political Values and Core Attitudes: 1987-2007

Increased public support for the social safety net, signs of growing public concern about income inequality, and a diminished appetite for assertive national security policies have improved the political landscape for the Democrats as the 2008 presidential campaign gets underway.

U.S. Politics Jan. 22, 2007

Broad Support for Political Compromise in Washington

A large majority of the American public thinks the country is more politically polarized than in the past, and an even greater number expresses a strong desire for political compromise. Fully three-quarters say they like political leaders who are willing to compromise, compared with 21% who see this as a negative trait.

Hispanic Nov. 27, 2006

Parsing the ’06 Latino Vote

Widely cited findings from the national exit polls suggest Latinos tilted heavily Democratic in the 2006 election, taking back most of the support they had granted the Republicans just two years earlier. Does that mean the Latinos who flirted with the Republican Party are now firmly back in the Democratic camp?

Pew Research Center Nov. 20, 2006

America’s Optimists: More Republican, But Fewer of Them

Since 2000, people have become far more pessimistic and partisan in their views about the country’s future — and their own.

U.S. Politics Nov. 16, 2006

Public Cheers Democratic Victory

The Democrats’ big win on Nov. 7 has gotten a highly favorable response from the public. In fact, initial reactions to the Democratic victory are as positive as they were to the GOP’s electoral sweep of Congress a dozen years ago.

U.S. Politics Nov. 14, 2006

The Real Message of the Midterms

A sweeping election tends to invite sweeping conclusions — and the Democrats’ takeover of both houses of Congress this November provides a tempting array of opportunities for exaggeration or misinterpretation. With that in mind, let’s look at the major lessons to be gleaned from the exit polls and opinion polls about how America voted this November.

Pew Research Center Nov. 14, 2006

Democrats Made Gains in All Regions of the Country

With roughly 95% of the votes tallied so far in House races across the country, the overall partisan breakdown is 52% for Democratic candidates, 46% for Republican candidates and 2% for others. In actual votes, Democratic House candidates in 2006 have already tallied nearly 5 million more votes than they did in 2002, while the Republican tally is down more than 3 million from four years ago.