Mar. 16, 2010

The Census: College Students Count — but Where?

Should college students be counted in the 2010 Census at their parents’ home or their school address? The Census Bureau has a cut-and-dried answer, but this question recurs each decade because census rules and people’s preferences are not always in sync.

U.S. Politics Mar. 16, 2010

Census: Growing Awareness, Most Ready For Forms

Those with lower levels of income and education remain significantly less likely than others to say they will take part in the census. All partisans want to participate, but Democrats are more likely than independents or Republicans to say the census will benefit their community.

Mar. 3, 2010

Census History: Counting Hispanics

Despite the long history of Hispanic residents in the United States, there was no systematic effort to count this group separately in the Census until the late 20th century. An analysis of changes in Census question wording over recent decades reveals the challenges in trying to count and describe this fast-growing population.

Feb. 12, 2010

The Prisoner Dilemma

Should the Census count inmates in the areas where they are incarcerated or try to link them to their hometowns?

Religion Jan. 26, 2010

A Brief History of Religion and the U.S. Census

Public debate over the propriety, merit and feasibility of the Census Bureau asking questions about religion has waxed and waned over many decades with religious groups, civil liberty groups, social scientists and the Census Bureau’s own staff divided over the issue.

Jan. 26, 2010

Conducting the 2010 Census

Director of the U.S. Bureau of the Census Robert Groves discusses the operational flow of the 2010 Census, design features intended to increase participation, the bureau’s communications campaign, real-time monitoring/management, and evaluation of the quality of the census.

U.S. Politics Jan. 20, 2010

Most View Census Positively, But Some Have Doubts

Most Americans think the census is very important and say they will definitely participate, but there are partisan as well as racial and ethnic differences in opinions about the values of the census and in personal willingness to participate.