Pew Research CenterNovember 8, 2010

Parsing Election Day Media

In today’s news landscape, both mainstream and new media sources shape the narrative. A new PEJ study finds that no single unified message reverberated throughout the media universe in the wake of the November 2 voting and what one learned depended largely on where one got the news.

Pew Research CenterAugust 19, 2010

The Fading Glory of the Television and Telephone

The TV and the landline phone are both losing their cachet in the digital age, as fewer consider them necessities. But while phones are being dumped, Americans are stocking up on ever more television sets — especially the big flat ones

Pew Research CenterMarch 15, 2010

State of the News Media 2010

Inside news companies, the most immediate worry is how much lost revenue the industry will regain as the economy improves. But the future of news depends on longer-term concerns. What are the prospects for alternative journalism organizations that are forming around the country? Will traditional media adapt and innovate amid continuing pressures to thin their ranks?

Pew Research CenterOctober 30, 2009

Partisanship and Cable News Audiences

In recent years, Republican viewers have migrated increasingly to Fox News but Democrats comprise a larger share of the Fox News audience than Republicans do of CNN’s audience.

Pew Research CenterMarch 16, 2009

State of the News Media 2009

Even before the recession, the fundamental question facing journalism was whether the news industry could win a race against the clock for survival. In the last year, two important things happened that have effectively shortened the time left on that clock. Some of the numbers are chilling.

Pew Research CenterOctober 29, 2008

The Color Of News: How Different Media Have Covered the General Election

When it comes to coverage of the campaign for president 2008, where one goes for news makes a difference, according to a new study.

Pew Research CenterMay 19, 2008

Tracking China’s Earthquake on TV and the Internet – Part II

In a second dispatch, our Beijing correspondent reports that Chinese TV is back to being the voice of the government. Meanwhile, the internet has become a more wild-west version of itself, with a virtual explosion of content that runs the gamut from informative to creative, irresponsible, angry, maudlin…

Pew Research CenterMay 16, 2008

Tracking China’s Earthquake on TV and the Internet

While the internet proved to be a faster and more varied source of news about the disaster, Chinese television reports have shown an unprecedented absence of censorship: “The faces in these productions tell everything. The soldiers are young; the grief is raw; the eyes are desperate.”

Pew Research CenterMay 8, 2008

The Daily Show: Journalism, Satire or Just Laughs?

An examination of whether America’s 4th-ranked journalist, Jon Stewart, is really the host of a news program.

Pew Research CenterApril 15, 2008

Network News Signing Off?

Speculation over Katie Couric’s future as anchor of the CBS Evening News has raised the broader question of how long the three nightly network news broadcasts will be able to survive.