Media & NewsMarch 19, 2012

What Facebook and Twitter Mean for News

Perhaps no topic in technology attracted more attention in 2011 than the rise of social media and its potential impact on news. “If searching for news was the most important development of the last decade, sharing news may be among the most important of the next,” we wrote in a May 2011 report analyzing online news behavior called Navigating News Online.

Media & NewsMarch 18, 2012

Mobile Devices and News Consumption: Some Good Signs for Journalism

The migration of audiences toward digital news advanced to a new level in 2011 and early 2012, the era of mobile and multidigital devices. More than three-quarters of U.S. adults own laptop or desktop computers, a number that has been stable for some years.1 Now, in addition, 44% of adults own a smartphone, and the number of tablet owners grew by about 50% since the summer of 2011, to 18% of Americans over age 18.

Pew Research CenterMarch 12, 2012

Social Networking Sites and Politics

Postings on social networking sites reveal surprises for many users when it comes to the political views of their friends. Nearly four-in-ten users discovered through postings by friends that their political beliefs were different than they thought. A small percentage of users blocked, unfriended or hidden someone on the site because their political postings.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 28, 2012

Millennials Will Benefit And Suffer Due to Hyperconnected Lives

While experts see many young people becoming nimble analysts and decision-makers because of their embrace of the networked world, they also warn that some constantly-connected teens and young adults will lack a deep engagement with people and knowledge by being hyperconnected.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 9, 2012

The Tone of Life on Social Networking Sites

An overwhelming majority (85%) of the adults who use social media report that people are usually kind on the sites. At the same time, 49% have witnessed mean and offensive behavior and they usually respond by ignoring it.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 3, 2012

Why Most Facebook Users Get More Than They Give

Most Facebook users receive more from their Facebook friends than they give, whether the measurement is the number of friend requests received, the use of the “like” button, the number of messages sent or tagging people in photos. The phenomenon is driven by a segment of “power users.”

Pew Research CenterDecember 23, 2011

The Civic and Community Engagement of Religiously Active Americans

Religiously active Americans are more tied to many civic and other organizations than non-religious Americans. Many report that their use of technology helps them in their group activities.

Pew Research CenterDecember 20, 2011

Texting, Social Networking Popular Worldwide

Two kinds of digital communication that have grown increasingly popular in the United States — sending text messages and using social networking sites — are also popular around the world.

Pew Research CenterDecember 8, 2011

Twitter and the Campaign

The political conversation on Twitter is markedly different than that on blogs—and both are decidedly different than the political narrative presented by the mainstream press, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism that analyzed more than 20 million tweets, the online conversation and traditional news coverage about the campaign.

Pew Research CenterNovember 15, 2011

Why Americans Use Social Media

The top reason cited by adults for using social media is to maintain connections with family and friends. Social media users also say these platforms help connect them to old friends with whom they’ve lost touch.