Fact Tank Jul. 28, 2014

Q/A: What the New York Times’ polling decision means

While online survey panels have long been used by market researchers, they’re relatively new in the opinion-research field, and views on them are sharply divided.

Religion Jul. 16, 2014

How Religious Groups View One Another

When asked to rate religious groups on a “feeling thermometer” ranging from 0 to 100, Americans rate Jews, Catholics and evangelical Christians warmly and atheists and Muslims more coldly.

Fact Tank Jul. 15, 2014

The demographics and politics of gun-owning households

Americans with young children in their home are just as likely as other adults to have a gun in their household.

Fact Tank Jul. 2, 2014

Facebook’s experiment causes a lot of fuss for little result

The controversy over what the Facebook researchers did may be overshadowing other important discussions, specifically conversations about what they really found—not much, actually—and the right and wrong way to think about and report findings based on statistical analyses of Big Data.

Fact Tank Jun. 27, 2014

Why the typology quiz questions are asked the way they are

One of the strongest reactions we have received from some quiz-takers is frustration over the either-or choices each question offers. This is a legitimate concern, but there is a reason the questions are asked the way they are: The intent is not to put people “in a box” but rather to understand how their values across multiple political dimensions are related to each other.

U.S. Politics Jun. 26, 2014

Beyond Red vs. Blue: The Political Typology

Our latest political typology sorts voters into cohesive groups based on their attitudes and values and provides a field guide for the constantly changing political landscape.

Fact Tank Jun. 26, 2014

Q/A: How Pew Research created the political typology

The goal of the political typology is to sort people into homogeneous groups, based on their political values and attitudes. It’s an effort to categorize people politically to help us better understand the complexities of the current political landscape.

Fact Tank Jun. 13, 2014

Why we didn’t include the y-axis on our polarization chart

In a histogram, it’s the area under the curve that matters, not the height of any specific point. The total area under the curve is equal to 100% of respondents, but we are most interested in where respondents fall along the horizontal axis.

U.S. Politics Jun. 12, 2014

Political Polarization in the American Public

Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan acrimony is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in recent history. And these trends manifest themselves in myriad ways, both in politics and in everyday life.

Fact Tank Jun. 12, 2014

How Pew Research conducted the polarization survey and launched a new research panel

Throughout its history, the Pew Research Center has periodically conducted major surveys that take an in-depth look at important trends in American political attitudes and behavior. Today we released one such survey on political polarization, which is arguably the defining feature of early 21st century American politics. This is reflected not only in the public’s […]