U.S. Politics Oct. 14, 2009

But What Do the Polls Show?

Perhaps the best way to think about public opinion and its relationship to politics and policymaking is that the American public is typically short on facts, but often long on judgment.

U.S. Politics Jul. 9, 2009

Accurately Locating Where Wireless Respondents Live Requires More Than A Phone Number

The mobile nature of wireless phones creates a significant problem for geographic sampling.This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the wireless-only are more geographically mobile than those with landline phones.

U.S. Politics Jun. 25, 2009

Perils of Polling in Election ’08

Despite such challenges as a growing wireless-only population, possible racially-related response bias and greater-than-usual difficulties in forecasting turnout, polllsters’ methods were evidently adequate to the task.

Pew Research Center Mar. 6, 2009

Why Surveys of Muslim Americans Differ

Because Muslim Americans make up a very small percentage of the U.S. public, it is difficult to provide a reliable picture of their views and differences in survey design can crucially affect findings.

Pew Research Center Mar. 3, 2009

New Tricks for Old — and New — Dogs

Pollsters and other communications researchers are finding their job ever more challenging but also more interesting, and, with the help of new techniques and data sources, even more amenable.